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Alternate History

Video Games (Napoleon's World)

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Video games are a form of interactive entertainment that are based mainly on TV-compatible consoles or on personal computers. Since their earliest inception in the late 1970's, the video game has grown and expanded into a legitimate art form and, oftentimes, as a major tool of propaganda in the ongoing Cold War between France and the United States.

First Generation (1972-1976)

France

United States

Second Generation (1976-1984)

France

United States

Third Generation (1984-1990)

France

United States

Japan

Fourth Generation (1990-1996)

France

United States

Japan

Alaska

In 1991, Kialgory-based computer company Videoworld launches a subsidiary company, called Videoplay, which releases the Videoplay Game Console. While the game mechanics for many of their games, including Alien Invasion, Hockey Tourney and Jungle Raider are notably advanced for their time, but issues like poor graphics, difficulty translating their products from Russian to English and lackluster marketing makes the Videoplay flop upon its US release in 1992. Despite sustaining brief popularity in Alaska during the 1990's, the first foray into video game development by an Alaskan company is unable to put a dent in a market cornered by the Japanese Nintendo and Sony companies. The Videoplay was pulled from American shelves in 1995 and was never marketed in Japan or France, and was pulled from Alaskan shelves in 1996 and became a collectors item.

Fifth Generation (1996-2002)

France

United States

The monopoly of the video game market held by Sega in the United States since the early 1980's was finally broken in 1998 with the marketing blitz unleashed by Tacoma-based software company Microsoft, which purchased Videoplay in 1997 to produce PC games and which formed a partnership with hardware giant Whitney Computers, based in nearby Bellingham, to begin work on a game console. In 2000, Microsoft scored an enormous coup by purchasing the struggling Sony Game Studios and, by proxy, adding their multiple successful franchises to their fold, developing a number of PC titles geared towards online multiplayer, which found a huge share of the market.

Sega still dominated the market in the late 1990's and early 2000's however with the 1998 release Sega Dreamcast, the first console to support online gaming for non-dial up modems and had a limited amount of games that could support online play. The limited Internet functions of the Dreamcast did not hurt Sega, which posted the highest profits by a video game company in history in 2001 thanks to the enormously popular Sonic World, the first massively popular online game.

Japan

Sixth Generation (2002-2007)

France

Spearheaded by the popularity of the online functions of the Aftermath franchise and both the traditional RPG and online mass-multiplayer versions of the Arcane Tribune franchises, Royale Studios continued their dominance of the PC gaming market in the 2000s. As console gaming advanced the abilities of hardware, Royale's exploration into the uses of the Internet and worldwide gaming experiences made them the most successful third-party developer in the world. Royale's $300 million agreement to release PC titles on the Whitney Xbox in 2006 was the first major publishing deal between French developers and American distributors in video game history, and was hailed as a sign of easing Cold War tensions between the two countries. In the fiscal year of 2005, Royale had a higher revenue as a third-party developer than Nintendo and Sega, despite both of their competitors having a produced console. In early 2007, Royale Studios introduced their first console by publishing the Royale Voyager, a handheld device hailed as more advanced internally than most early smartphones of the era.

United States

The Christmas 2002 release of the Whitney Xbox, which featured an exclusive deal with Microsoft Game Studios and their vast array of games as well as a slew of eager third-party developers, was an enormous success for the company, which at the time was competing with upstart software company Windstream for market share. The hardware-software deal between Whitney and Microsoft proved to be a "marriage made in heaven," according to reviewers, who were impressed by the high sales of the Xbox, which was driven largely by the release of Grand Theft Auto III, a former Sony label moved to the Xbox, as well as the Halo series, a reimagining of the Alien Invasion game released on the Videoplay, as well as a multitude of mature, advanced games that utilized improved graphics and a powerful processor based on PC technology. Xbox Live, the online component, was regarded as considerably more advanced than Sega's OnWorld online competitor.

Needing to keep pace with Xbox, Sega released its next-gen console, the Sega Gameverse in 2003. With a focus on older consumers used to advanced online play, the Gameverse OnWorld online function was popular, but technologically inferior to Xbox Live, although Sega's tentpole games such as platformer Sonic Unleashed, English Adventure FPS Medal of Honor II and third-person shooter Dinosaur Hunter sold enormously well. Sega's mature fantasy RPG series Dark Quest was a huge success, becoming the best-selling game of 2004 and its sequel, Dark Quest II: Knighthood landing just behind Medal of Honor IV as the best-selling game of 2006.

Japan

Seventh Generation (2007-)

France

United States

Japan

Alaska

Major Franchises

Aftermath

Halo

Sonic the Hedgehog

Medal of Honor

Mario

James Bond

Martin Jones

Call of Duty

Grand Theft Auto

Red Faction





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