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Timeline (A Less Perfect Union)

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The timeline of A Less Perfect Union follows world history and events from 1769 to the present day.

1760's

1769

John Adams (1766)

John Adams in 1766

January 2 (POD): Massachusetts lawyer John Adams, second cousin of New England founder Samuel Adams, decides to skate at Fresh Pond, a small lake near his house on Brattle Street. Adams skated over a patch of thin ice and falls into the water. The young lawyer soon dies of hypothermia, and the local community mourns the untimely death of such a promising, bright man.

June 7: Pennsylvania frontiersmen and future President of Kentucky Daniel Boone begins to explore present day Kentucky.

1770's

1770

Boston massacre

A depiction of the Boston Massacre in Adams Hall, the official residence of the President of New England

March: The Boston Massacre occurs on March 15, in which British soldiers shoot eleven New Englanders, fatally wounding five of them. At the suggestion of Samuel Adams, Josiah Quincy II is appointed to defend the troops in court, all of which are later found guilty. Adams interest in justice increased at this time, later even using the trial as an example of how rational justice is just as powerful as an angry mob mentality.

1771

April 18: Samuel Adams delivers a speech calling for the avoidance of British goods and increase in Massachusetts exports. He argues that relying on British goods would be abandoning Puritan values, and that self reliance and high production rates are key to a successful future for Massachusetts. The speech is later distributed throughout Boston, increasing Adams' popularity and booming Massachusetts pride.

1772

May 1: Seeing the success of Boston exports, Parliament decides to implement an export tax on Massachusetts merchants. This infuriates merchants, who move to nearby cities, such as Portsmouth, New Hampshire and Providence, Rhode Island.

1773

June 4: British Parliament passes the Tea Act, giving the East India Company a monopoly in the American colonies. The massive surplus of tea sold by the East India Company is cheaper even smuggled tea, causing an uproar among American merchants everywhere.

1774

Boston tea party

The Boston Tea Party just before British traders retaliate

January 24: The Boston Tea Party begins under the orders of Samuel Adams, claiming it to be a just protest, and not a mob. A group of about 300 men board British ships and begin throwing tea into the harbor, however the scene quickly became violent. News of the conflict spreads quickly throughout the colonies and to London.

March 29: The first of The Intolerable Acts begins with the Boston Occupation Act, allowing the British military to occupy Boston, stopping all trade and normal political activity. Samuel Adams goes into hiding in New Hampshire, however the British are unaware of his involvement in the Boston Tea Party.

June 15: The next of The Intolerable Acts, the Quartering Act, is enacted. Americans are forced to house British troops that wish to stay in American homes.

June 29: The Quebec Act is past, expanding the province down to border North Carolina. Americans begin to fear that Britain is attempting to contain the United States in case of rebellion.

Washington-0

George Washington, the liberator of Anglo-America

July 18: George Washington incorporates the Fairfax County Militia, a unit under private, not British control.

August 4: The First Continental Congress meets in Philadelphia in order to sign a petition ending the Intolerable Acts. George Washington calls for complete mobilization of the Colonies, warning that tyranny was about to begin. Massachusetts leaders, including Samuel Adams who came out of hiding in order to attend, radically support independence, citing the occupation of Boston as a possible future of the Colonies.

September 13: Two flags in Exeter, New Hampshire, the location of Samuel Adams' hiding, are raised, one saying Liberty and the other Live Free or Die. British troops occupying Boston are informed of the defiance.

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