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Rules (Battle for Earth Strikes Back! Map Game)

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After discussing this in the think tank on my blog, we came to the consensus that, while this is a fun game, the empires we were creating were implausibly large, resulting in people claiming huge swaths of territory.

General Rules

  • You may have one human nation and one alien nation. Please focus on your human nation as much as you do for your alien nation. Don't use your human nation just as an invasion springboard. You can invade it using your alien nation, but you don't get another human nation.
  • Be pleasant to work with.
  • Be plausible. Yes, you can be plausible in an ASB game.
  • No time travel
  • Don't cause mass destruction to the solar system. This means no causing severe damage to any of the planets, major moons, minor planets, or large swaths of asteroids.
  • None of the aforementioned stellar bodies are really space stations, ships, warp gates, etc. They're stellar bodies.
  • Keep the action confined to Earth for now.
  • The POD is at the beginning of the universe, but nobody had widespread contact with aliens until the game begins.
  • Battle for Earth: Prime is the go-to place for canon articles. If it's there, it happened.

Space Notes

These are more notes about how these things work than actual rules.

  • Space is empty and habitable planets are rare.
  • Setting up camp on uninhabitable bodies, extensive subterranean or bubbled colonies takes a long time to create. For them to make a difference in the race's empire takes even longer.
  • Important planets will be separated by millions of km while important systems will be separated by tens of lightyears.
  • Galactic empires would hold a few habitable planets, a bunch of uninhabitable planets, maybe some space stations and that's pretty much their territory.
  • A planet that matters takes a long time to take over.
  • Territories on the galaxy map are set and cannot change over the course of this game.
  • There are stars outside of the visible spirals.
  • You may not go outside of the galaxy (as determined by the maps) and you may not hail from another galaxy. This includes satellite galaxies.
  • The galaxy is not a flat disk. The systems usually are a few lightyears away from an average 'altitude' of systems. Take Planet Dave and Planet Steve for example. These planets, if you're looking at a bird's eye view of the solar system, look like they're right next to each other. In reality, Planet Dave is three lightyears above the 'average altitude of systems' and Planet Steve is maybe one lightyear below the average. Pizza Planet, we're leaving out of this discussion.
  • Realistically, you can't blockade a system. A planet, maybe, but not a system. Say you had a blockade in the Oort Cloud. If you had one ship for every oort body, you've still got a really ineffective blockade. So you know what this means? Territorial claims, realistically, don't mean shit. Yeah, Race A can say that he holds the entire Perseus Arm. Race B might recognize it and Race D might recognize it since they've known these guys for forever. Race C, however, might not know about the claims due to their being a new empire and Race E might be a dickhead and just go through Race A's space. Given the probability of him actually going near any inhabited systems or ships, there is nothing Race A can do about it .
  • The Galaxy Map we know represents a bird's eye view and, while it is great for showing us what a galaxy looks like, it's a horrible way to represent territories. The solar system we live in isn't a dot with a little arrow that says 'you are here'. It's a complex ball of celestial bodies and gas that, despite what science fiction will have you believe, is mostly empty. A good representation of territories is a 3D star map on a plane. You know what kind of plane I mean.
  • You get, at most, ten major systems (above 7th scale tier). Minor colonies and territories (Anything below 7th tier) will be restricted to 110 (again, space is really big and these things will be more like dots than things defining a shaded region.

Alien Rules

  • Don't steal other people's races
  • Don't steal from published fiction
  • Beware with alternative biochemistry. Try to stick with carbon based life, but silicon based life is fine too. When in doubt, ask.
  • Give your race a goal. Why is it on Earth? Is it fighting for humans or does it want the humans gone? Why?
  • We will be using Battle for Earth: Prime for alien species pages.
  • If it's already been established on BFE: Prime , it's canon.
  • Your race gets its own unique perk that nobody else can have.

Map Page Rules

The map page is where all territory in space is located. Please do not edit the map. List all territories below the map in the appropriate space.

Use the following template:

Planet Name

  • Name of Star
  • Scale of Colonization (1-10)
  • Exports
  • Size
  • Notes (Points of interest, etc.)

Scale of Colonization

  1. Practically barren
  2. Research world
  3. Tiny colony
  4. Small colony
  5. Medium colony with more than one settlement
  6. Large colony with more than one settlement
  7. Large colony with several cities
  8. Large colony with many cities (to the scale of Earth)
  9. Massive colony
  10. City-Planet

Exports

Worlds can export a wide variety of materials to aid your empire. From metals for starships to even air, planets exist to make money. List the resources the planets export

Size

Assign numerical values to the size based on the following chart. Asteroids and gas giants cannot hold a colony above fifth tier.

  1. Asteroid
  2. Dwarf Planet
  3. Tiny Planet (Like Mercury)
  4. Small (Like Mars)
  5. Medium (Like Earth)
  6. Large Terrestrial
  7. Small Gas Giant
  8. Medium Gas Giant
  9. Massive Gas Giant
  10. Collossal Gas Giant

Notes

List points of interest, what the planet is like, and if it a homeworld or important rule.

Space Station Template

Name of Station

  • Habitation
  • Size
  • Purpose
  • Notes

Habitation

  1. Uninhabited Satellite
  2. Minimal (International Space Station size)
  3. Tiny Crew
  4. Small Crew
  5. Medium Crew
  6. Large Crew
  7. Massive Crew
  8. Gargantuan Crew
  9. Small Artificial Planet*
  10. Large Artificial Planet*
  • Counts as planet/colony

Size

  1. Satellite
  2. Early Space Station
  3. Tiny Space Station
  4. Small Space Station
  5. Medium Space Station
  6. Large Space Station*
  7. Massive Space Station*
  8. Permanent Orbital Structure
  9. Small Artificial Planet*
  10. Large Artificial Planet*
  • Counts as a planet/colony

Purpose

Why was it built?

War

  • You may declare a war on any country on your turn.
  • You may have any NPC declare war on you as long as it is plausible.
  • Use the appropriate algorithms for all attacks.
  • Each enemy encounter is a single battle.
  • Keep in mind that it may take several battles to crush your enemies.
  • Upon entering enemy territory remember that after pushing back enemy forces, you must allot time to occupation. Keep in mind how big an area might be, and how many soldiers you have to enter the countryside. Also keep in mind where they are getting their supplies. If a clear stockpile or route for supplies isn’t available, your forces may have to pillage the local villages or face death from attrition. Once an area is occupied, you do not own it. It is still the defender’s land, but you are currently controlling it. Annexation of enemy’s land is later agreed upon in the peace treaty.
  • All nations are encouraged to think tactically and develop actual plans for invasions/battles. By publishing a description of your actions (or making a page documenting your pre-battle maneuvers) you will be more likely to succeed.
  • Nations can move up in rank based on tactical and diplomatic thinking. Unlike other map games, we don't (and can't) have an algo, so we judge victory based on three things. Plausibility, description (more = better), and diplomatic workings. A Class II Lower nation can beat a Class II Upper, despite the disparity in power, if they manage to wrangle support from stronger nations, or post more about their plans and actions, or act more intelligently. Note that support - NEED NOT MEAN WAR.

Declaration

Use the following algorithm to determine if your stability drops when declaring war. Add up the number at the end, and that is how many points you lose (negative does nothing). Note if you fail to reach one of your objectives then your stability drops by two.

The casus belli "faked terrorist attack" includes any events that you created in your turn. Faked terrorist attacks must be used cautiously. Every time they are used there is a small chance that the public will uncover the true, which can have negative consequences.

Casus Belli

  • Unjustly attacked (-5)
  • Terrorist attack (-3)
  • Attacked ally (-2)
  • Faked Terrorist Attack (-1)
  • Political blunder (-1)
  • None (+3)

Casus belli is not needed for tribes or city-state engagements unless said tribe/city-state is a vassal to a larger more powerful nation.

Objective

Acquire Core. Wish to annex a province/state that is our rightful land. (-2)

Annex Territory. Wish to annex a province/state. (+3)

Add to Sphere. We wish to forcefully establish this state under our sphere of influence, establishing a puppet state. (+2) Assert Hegemony Forcefully take back state(s) that are culturally similar to ours from another great power's sphere of influence. (+1) Civil War Take back land that has been claimed by rebels. (0)

Conquest. We wish to forcefully annex this smaller state (+4)

Containment. We believe this state is becoming too powerful and must be contained. (+1)

If in a coalition of three or more nations: (0) Cut Down to Size. We wish to partially remove this nation's military so they are no longer a threat. (+2)

Demand Concession. We demand this state cede one of their colonies to us.

(+3)

Establish Protectorate. We wish to establish this state as a protectorate.

(+2) Free People. We wish to liberate provinces that have been wrongfully occupied or annexed, and give them back to their rightful owners.

(-1) Humiliate. We wish to lower this nation's prestige and political standing.


(+3) Release Puppet. We demand that this state release other nations that they have forced into becoming a puppet.

(+1) Restore Order. Used to annex a nation that is comprised completely of our core states. We believe every one of its provinces belong to us.

(0) War of Unification. We are annexing states that are culturally part of a greater nation.

(0) No Objective. We don't even know why we're here, we're just mad.

(+4) Modifiers Pacifist government: (+2) Religious motive: (-2) Breaking treaty: (+3) Frequent Enemy: (-1)

Total Add up your score from all of the declarations and objectives. If your number is positive, subtract that number from your stability. If it is zero, or negative, nothing happens.

When declaring war it is encouraged to write your declaration on the talk page, so you can specify your objectives.

Algorithm

Location

Location goes by capital city.

  • at the location of the war: 5
  • next to the location of the war: 4
  • close to the location of the war: 3
  • far from location of the war: 2
  • other side of the world: 1
  • Not in this system: 0

Tactical Advantage

Defender:

  • No defenses, open field, etc: 1
  • High ground/ambush: 2
  • Pesky Humans (Only works for humans against Aliens): 2
  • Basic earthworks, makeshift defenses, ruins, Rivers: 3
  • Fortifications, basic defenses: 4
  • High-security fortress, turrets: 5
  • City fortified by aliens: 7

Attacker:

  • No defenses, open field, etc: 1
  • High ground/ambush: 2
  • Bombardment: 5 (takes two turns to position fleet)

A country receives high ground/ambush if: 1) The battle location, or area where the army in question is located has a high topographic prominence, meaning it is surrounded by areas of significantly lower elevation. Even plateaus count, but it must be so that the enemy has to climb the mountain to capture the location. 2) The defenders are meeting a force invading from the coast. This means in all invasions involving crossing water in boats/ships and meeting an enemy immediately at the beach starts at this level.


Nations Per Side on the War

  • M for military aid (+3), S for supplies (+2), V for vassalization or subordination (-1) and then W for withdrawal (-1). So a list of belligerents read like China (L), Zhuang Warlords (MVW), Japan (M), Korea (MW), Hawaiian rebels (MV), Mali (SW), creating a score of 13.

Military Development:

  • Your current army score * 10
  • If you are defending, your Economic score is also included, multiplied by 4.
  • If the battle is near water, and you have a navy stationed nearby then your naval score is also included, multiplied by 3.

Expansion:

  • Expansion by location: -1 for every area occupied over the past 15 years. (ie. if Carthage is attacking both Romian Italy and Western Egypt they receive a -2, as they are attacking TWO fronts and thus are using more supply lines. This still applies to occupied areas that are connected to another).
  • War-Weariness: -1 for every turn you are at war for the past 15 (This means even if you fighting two battles in one turn you only get -1 for that turn in the algo - however, attacking two places would result in a -2 in Expansion by location).

Motive:

  • motive is life or death (country's sovereign existence is threatened): 10
  • motive is religious: 7
  • motive is social or moral: 6
  • motive is political: 5
  • motive is economic: 3

If there are multiple motives, the one told to the army will be selected.

Nation Tiers:

Based on the Scrawland Scale

1 tier above = +5

2 Tiers = +10

etc.

If a human nation however is trading with alien nations this may in fact be nullified if the nation has acquired these weapons/Armors through trade or the like

Chance

0 to 9 points will be awarded to each person based on chance. The Chance will be decided by a Random Number Generator of 1-10.

Stability

  • Your current stability divided by two.

Participation

All nations get a +10 on this (Nations as in side, if two nations are participating, such as one sending supplies and military, there is still only a +10 for the side).

Number of Troops

  • Friendly soldiers / Enemy soldiers.

Trait: Depends on how much the trait you choose helps in warfare. Can range from 1 (barely helpful) to 10 (useful only in war).

Opting Out Some scores may not affect some races as much as others. To opt out of a factor, ask CrimsonAssassin- "I have special eyes" and make a case. For each factor you opt out of, you lose five points.

Space Battle Algorithm

Location

Location goes by nearest friendly port.

  • at the location of the battle: 5
  • within .1 AU: 4
  • Within .5 AU: 3
  • Within 1 AU: 2
  • More than 1 AU away: 1
  • Attacking from another system: 0

Tactical Advantage

Defender:

  • Open Space: 1
  • Expecting attack: 2

Attacker:

  • Open Space: 1
  • Ambush: 2

Nations Per Side on the War

  • M for military aid (+3), S for supplies (+2), V for vassalization or subordination (-1) and then W for withdrawal (-1). So a list of belligerents read like China (L), Zhuang Warlords (MVW), Japan (M), Korea (MW), Hawaiian rebels (MV), Mali (SW), creating a score of 13

Military Development:

  • Your naval score * 10
  • If you are defending, and you are near a port, your economic score is * 4.

Expansion:

  • Expansion by location: -1 for every area occupied over the past 15 years. (ie. if the Mechs are attacking both New York City and London they receive a -2, as they are attacking TWO fronts and thus are using more supply lines. This still applies to occupied areas that are connected to another).
  • War-Weariness:
    • One turn in space: -2
    • Two turns at space: -3
    • Three turns at space: -4
    • All War-Weariness can be negated by stationing your navy in a friendly space station or keeping them stationary for one full turn.
    • If you keep them at a space station for part of a turn, and then send them out again, it is +1 on your current war- weariness.

Motive:

  • motive is life or death (country's sovereign existence is threatened): 10
  • motive is religious: 7
  • motive is social or moral: 6
  • motive is political: 5
  • motive is economic: 3

If there are multiple motives, the one told to the army will be selected.

Nation Tiers:

1 tier above = +5

2 Tiers = +10

etc etc etc.


Chance

0 to 9 points will be awarded to each person based on chance. The Chance will be decided by a Random Number Generator of 1-10.

Debris

0 to 10 points as decided by a Random Number Generator and posted on by a mod with chance. It affects the attacker if the defender is not expecting and prepared for an attack.

1-4 = Clear Weather = 0 for attacker/unprepared defender, +1 for prepared attacker/prepared defender.

5-6 = Small space debris = -1 for attacker/unprepared defender, 0 for prepared attacker/prepared defender.

7-9 = Large space debris = -2 for attacker/unprepared defender, -1 for prepared attacker/unprepared defender.

10 = Solar storm = -3 for attacker/unprepared defender, -2 for prepared attacker/prepared defender.

Stability

  • Your current stability divided by two

Participation

All nations get a +10 on this

Number of ships

  • Friendly ships / Enemy ships

Trait Depends on how much the trait you choose helps in warfare. Can range from 1 (barely helpful) to 10 (useful only in war).

Opting Out Some scores may not affect some races as much as others. To opt out of a factor, ask CrimsonAssassin- "I have special eyes" and make a case. For each factor you opt out of, you lose 5 points.

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