Alternate History

Mongolian Sovereignty Movement (New Union)

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Flag of Mongolia (1911-1921)

The old Mongolian flag is used as a opposition flag.

The Mongol sovereignty movement refers to the history and present status of multiple, multi-lateral political movement aimed at the secession of the republic of Mongolia from the USSR. Supporters of the movement advocate a variety of proposals. While some sovereignists do advocate full independence, others have advocated sovereignty association or sovereignty partnership, under which Mongolia, while becoming a country of its own, would still continue to maintain an economic and political relationship with the Union. The association or partnership with the Union does not mean that Mongolia would still be a part of the USSR, but it would create a new relationship between two sovereign states. (See disfranchisement). In practice, "separatist" and "sovereignist" are terms used to describe individuals wanting the republic of Mongolia to separate from the Union to become a country of its own. However, the latter term is perceived as euphemistic by proponents of remaining within the USSR while the former term is perceived as pejorative by the people within the sovereigntist movement. Justifications for Mongolia's sovereignty include its unique culture and Mongol-speaking majority (80%). Eight of the other Soviet Republics are overwhelmingly (greater than 60%) Russian-speaking, while far east Russia is officially bilingual and about one-third Mongolian. Another rationale is based on resentment to anti-Mongolia sentiment. With regard to the creation of the sovereignist movement, language issues were but a sub-stratum of larger cultural, social and political differences. Many scholars point to historical events as framing the cause for ongoing support for sovereignty in Mongolia.

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