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Federal Offices of the United States of America (Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation)

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Federal Offices are the highest levels of office in the in the US government.

Executive

The Executive arm is the part of government that has sole authority and responsibility for the daily administration of the state. The executive branch executes the law. The division of power into separate branches of government is central to the idea of the separation of powers.

Colonel-General

The Colonel-General controlls the entirety of the US military and is enforced with the power to enforce the rulings of Congress and to "raise and command" the military. The Colonel-General is selected by the United States in Congress Assembled and serves for "good behavior". The Colonel-General is also the head of the executive branch and serves as the Head of State and receives foreign heads of state and sets foreign diplomacy.

Secretary of State

The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs.

Secretary of the Army

The United States Secretary of Army is the head of the Department of the Army. In 1866 the Department of War was disestablished and the Department of the Army was created in its place. The Secretary of the Army is the second in command of the US Army after the President of the United States and before the Chief of Staff of the Army. The US Air Force is under the direct control of the US Army and thus the Secretary of the Army.

Secretary of the Navy

The United States Secretary of the Navy is the head of the Department of the Navy. Secretary of the Navy is second in command of the USN after the President of the United States and before the Chief of Naval Operations. The US Marine Corps is under the direct control of the USN and thus the Secretary of the Navy.

Secretary of the Treasury

The Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with economic affairs. The Department of the Treasury's main concerns are the enforcement of economic laws set by the US Congress. The Department of the Treasury's main arms in doing so are the United States Coast Guard, the United States Internal Revenue Service, and the United States Customs Service.

Secretary of the Interior

The Department of the Interior oversees such agencies as the Bureau of Land Management, the United States Geological Survey, Department of Agriculture, and the National Park Service. The Secretary also serves on and appoints the private citizens on the National Park Foundation board. The Secretary is a member of the President's Cabinet. Department of the Interior also directly controls US federal property.

Secretary of Prisons

The Federal Bureau of Prisons is a federal law enforcement agency that often works in conjunction with the Department of Justice and the United States Marshals Service. The Federal Bureau of Prisons is responsible for the administration of the federal prison system. The system also handles prisoners who committed acts considered felonies under the District of Columbia's law.

Secretary of Espionage

The United States Secretary of Espionage oversees international espionage operations by non-military bodies. The Secretary of Espionage is the direct commander of the Central Intelligence Agency and personally oversees the creation of secret federal government facilities. The Secretary of Espionage also oversees the creation of Continuity of Government Plans in case of catastrophe.

Attorney General

The United States Attorney General (AG) is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. The attorney general is considered to be the chief lawyer of the U.S. government. The attorney general serves as a member of the president's cabinet, and is one of only two cabinet department heads who are not given the title secretary, besides the now independent postmaster general.

Postmaster General

The United States Postmaster General is the chief executive officer of the United States Postal Service. The office, in one form or another, is older than both the United States Constitution and the United States Declaration of Independence.

Commander-in-Chief of the Marshals Service

The Marshals Service is part of the executive branch of government, and is the enforcement arm of the United States federal courts. The U.S. Marshals are responsible for the protection of court officers and buildings and the effective operation of the judiciary and the enforcement of judicial decisions. The service also assists with court security and prisoner transport, serves federal arrest warrants, seeks fugitives, perform internal espionage, and investigates federal crimes. The Marshals Service took control of the duties of the FBI after the attempted coup orchestrated by J. Edgar Hoover in 1953. After 9/11 Attacks the Marshals Service's powers were vastley expanded to include OTL Homeland Security's powers.

Legislative

The United States in Congress Assembled is divided into two houses the Senate and the House of Representitives. The Senators serve at the pleasure of the States and the Representitives are elected every year.

President of the United States

The President of the United States is elected every four years. He has the power to veto any bills passed by either house or to accept them. The President of the United States is elected by popular election. He also has the power to appoint Judges and to set domestic policy.

President of the United States Senate

The President of the Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate. By a convention established in the 81st Congress, the senior senator in the majority party is normally elected. Normally the President of the Senate does not preside; instead, the duty is generally delegated to the junior senators of the majority party to help them learn parliamentary procedure. The President of the Senate, in the case of a tie vote, casts the deciding vote, he also writes and publishes "the Senate's Reasons for Acceptance" after any bill larger than fifteen pages is accepted by the Senate. 

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the chamber. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states in part, "The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker..." . The Constitution does not require that the Speaker be an elected Member of Congress, but no non-member has ever been elected to the office. Unlike in some Westminster system parliaments, in which the office of speaker is considered to be non-partisan, in the United States the speakership of the House is a leadership position in the majority party and the office-holder actively works to set that party's legislative agenda; the office is therefore endowed with considerable political power.

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