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Denmark (Triple Entente vs. Central Powers Map Game)

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Kingdom of Denmark
Kongeriget Danmark (Danish)
Timeline: Triple Entente vs. Central Powers (Map Game)
OTL equivalent: Denmark
Flag of Denmark.svg National Coat of arms of Denmark.svg
Motto: 
"Guds hjælp, Folkets kærlighed, Danmarks styrke"
"God's Help, the People's Love, Denmark's Strength"
Anthem: 
"Der er et yndigt land"

"There is a lovely land"
Royal anthem: 
"Kong Christian stod ved højen mast"

"King Christian stood by the lofty mast"
Denmark TE v. CP (SVG).svg
Dark green: Greenland, the Faroe Islands (circled), and Denmark.
CapitalCopenhagen
Official languages Danish
Regional Languages Faroese, Greenlandic, Icelandic, German
Demonym Danish

Dane

Government Unitary parliamentary Constitutional monarchy
 -  Monarch Frederick VIII
 -  Prime Minister
Legislature Folketing
Area
 -  Total 42,915.7 km2 
16,570 sq mi 
Population
 -  1900 estimate 2,432,000 
Currency Danish krone


Denmark (Danish: Danmark), officially the Kingdom of Denmark (Danish: Kongeriget Danmark), is a sovereign state in Northern Europe, located south-west of Sweden, south of Norway, and bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom has two autonomous constituent countries in the north Atlantic Ocean; the Faroe Islands and Greenland. The Kingdom of Denmark is a unitary constitutional monarchy with Christian IX as reigning monarch. The government is organised into a parliamentary democracy, which replaced the system of absolute monarchy in 1660 with the Constitution of Denmark, which was signed on 5 June 1849.

Denmark consists of the peninsula of Jutland, and the Danish archipelago of 407 islands, characterized by flat lands and sandy coasts, containing minimal elevation. Denmark has a temperate climate characterized by mild winters and cool summers. The national language, Danish, is spoken by most Danish citizens, and is closely related to Swedish and Norwegian.











History

Main Article: History of Denmark

Modern History

Grundlovgivende rigsforsamling - Constantin Hansen

Den Grundlovsgivende Rigsforsamling – The Constitutional Assembly of the Realm was assembled by King Frederick VII in 1848 to adopt the Constitution of Denmark.

During the 1830s Denmark's liberal and national movement gained momentum, and during the European Revolutions of 1848 Denmark peacefully became a constitutional monarchy on 5 June 1849. The Constitutional Act of Denmark, or Danmarks Riges Grundlov in Danish, were established as the main part of the Danish constitution, establishing a sovereign state in the form of a constitutional monarchy, with a representative parliamentary system. A bicameral parliament known as the Rigsdag was established over the nation, consisting of a upper and lower house; the Landsting and the Folketing respectively.

The main principle of the Constitution was to limit the monarch's power, with the creation of parliament distributing power to the Danish people. The constitution also secured civil rights, such as habeas corpus, private property rights, and freedom of speech. The structure of the Constitution was based on the separation of powers, creating three separate branches of government; the legislative, the executive, and the judicial branches.

8 brigades angreb ved Dybbøl 1864

8th Brigade's Attack at Dybbøl, 1864 by Vilhelm Jacob Rosenstand, 1894.

In 1864 Denmark was invaded by the Kingdom of Prussia and the Austrian Empire, in the Second Schleswig War. Lasting from 1 February to 30 October, the war ended in the Treaty of Vienna, in which Denmark was forced to cede the provinces of Schleswig and Holstein. Prussia would administer Schleswig, while Austria would administer Holstein, but disputes over the administration of the two provinces would eventually lead to the Austro-Prussian War in 1866.

Like the First Schleswig War of 1848 to 1851, the Second Schleswig War was fought for control of the duchies of Holstein and Lauenburg, due to succession disputes arising from the death of the Danish king without an heir acceptable to the German Confederation. Decisive controversy arose due to the passing of the November Constitution, which integrated the Duchy of Schleswig into the Danish kingdom in violation of the London Protocol.

Reign of Christian IX

With the dawn of the twentieth century the nation of Denmark turned its attention toward modernizing the military, focusing land forces toward putting up an adequate defense against possible invasion, and developing a strong navy for defending Danish territories and possessions. In between two strong military powers in the North Sea; the United Kingdom and Germany, Denmark signed a non aggression pact with both nations to ensure its sovereignty in both nation's rapid military expansion. Also that year the Rigsdagen passed an act organizing the nation's military, creating the Forsvaret, Danish Defense, as a unified armed forces for the nation of Denmark and its possessions. A reserve system was also formed, known as as the Hjemmeværnet, or Home Guard, a national guard aspect of the Danish military intended to raise manpower and defend Danish territory during a full scale invasion.

As part of the military reforms, a total of 200,000 men from across the Danish empire would be trained for active service or as a reserve force over the next decade. Of that force, 50,000 men began immediate training to establish five divisions stationed in the south of the nation, intending to defend Jutland from attack. An additional 5,000 man division was raised from the Home Guard to defend Copenhagen and Sjaelland.

In 1901 Denmark signed a research agreement with the nations of Italy and Germany to develop a modern navy capable of defending Denmark and each other in case of attack. This pact sought to work together in development of new ships and weapons, and would eventually begin conducting joint military drills to mutually grow each nation's forces and technology. As part of this naval development and modernization, the nation of Denmark also created or expanded a number of shipyards around the nation, to facilitate the production or repair of warships quickly and easily. Over the next few years shipyards in Aalborg, Svendborg, two in Copenhagen, two in Odense, and Esbjerg would be tasked with creating the nation's naval assets.

Domestically the nation began improving and expanding railroad transportation to facilitate faster movement of goods and people. A special rail was laid across Jutland, to allow for fast mobilization to the south of the country if needed. An improved system was created to connect Zeeland and Jutland, known collectively as the Storebæltsfærgerne, or Great Belt ferries.

Plans were created for a defensive structure similar to the Dannevirke on our new southern border, envisioned with modern artillery emplacements and defenses, learning from our experiences in previous wars with Prussia and Austria. Beginning construction in 1902, newly created railroad lines streamlined production, which continued for the next few years. A number of artillery emplacements were created in the south to guard major fortifications, using indirect fire artillery, and the military began testing a prototype for railroad artillery, noticing that twelve-inch guns being shipped to the south could be mobilized faster if installed into railroad cars directly.

The nation also turned its attention toward developing industry and exploiting resources in Danish territories and colonial possessions. In Greenland industry in the town of Ivittuut was increased, to begin large-scale extraction of cryolite, an important agent in modern aluminum extraction. Since Ivittuut was one of the only sites in the world in which cryolite could be extracted, the Danish government sought to exploit the resource for high profits in Europe and elsewhere. A large dock was constructed to facilitate shipments of ore from Greenland, increasing exports to Denmark.

Danish possessions also began organizing forces to defend themselves and fight alongside Danish soldiers if needed. A special volunteer brigade of the Home Guard was established on Greenland, seeking 1,000 men to serve in a local force, and a small training camp was established near Nuuk. A second brigade was formed in the Faroe Islands, with a training camp being established in Tórshavn, while in Iceland two brigades were formed. Together this force was designated as the Danish Colonial Regiment of the Home Guard, with its headquarters in Reykjavík. Small shipyards began construction in Reykjavík and Tórshavn, with the intention of forming areas capable of constructing small ships for colonial use.

In 1906 an expedition was sent to Adventtoppen in Svalbard to establish mining operations on the island. A coal mine was established, and a small dock began production to ship coal to Denmark. Within the next several months, Denmark would officially purchase Svalbard, along with the island of Jan Mayen, from the Sweden and Norway. The official acquisition of the island of Svalbard allowed it to grow exponentially. The Danish colony in Adventtoppen became known as Kortårby, and grew to become a major mining town and port in the far north, growing from the mining industry and from Arctic tourism, becoming a common base for Arctic exploration. Multiple mines would be established across the island, with the main port at Kortårby shipping coal and other resources back to Denmark for use in the nation’s factories and manufacturers. That year an act was passed organizing Danish possessions into administrative regions, with both Svalbard and Jan Mayen being organized into the Ishavet Territories, with an administrative center established at Kortårby.

Reign of Frederick VIII

On 29 January 1906, Christian IX died peacefully of old age at the age of eighty-seven at the Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen after a reign of forty-two years and seventy-five days. After lying in state at the chapel at Christiansborg Palace, he was interred beside Queen Louise in Christian IX's Chapel in Roskilde Cathedral, the traditional burial site for Danish monarchs since the 15th century. He was succeeded as king by his eldest son, Frederick, who ascended the throne as King Frederick VIII. Frederick was sixty-two years old at the time and had been Crown Prince for forty-three years.

In many ways Frederick VIII was a liberal ruler who was much more favorable to the new parliamentarian system than his father had been. Because of his very late accession to the throne he had only a few years to show his ability and he was weakened by ill health. Frederick VII largely continued the military reforms that his father had began, expanding and training the military, and organizing Danish forces. That year the union between Sweden and Norway broke up, and Frederick VIII's brother ascended to the throne of Norway as Haakon VII. Frederick immediately established positive relations with both Norway and Sweden, leading to years of prosperous trade and cooperation.

In 1907 Frederick VIII founded the Nordsøenpagt, or North Sea Pact, as a defensive alliance specializing in naval research and development between Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. It was under Frederick VIII that the Royal Danish Navy established a modern system for organization and command, championed by Defence Minister Jens Christian Christensen. Danish commander Henri Konow would be promoted to admiral and supervisor of the Danish navy, broken into two main fleets; the Storflåde (Grand Fleet), stationed in Copenhagen, and the Atlanterflade (Atlantic Fleet), stationed in Reykjavik.

The pact would launch its largest naval exercise to date the following year, launching several drills across the North Sea. Also that year Germany and the United Kingdom would be invited to join the pact as observers. Konow would personally travel to Germany to invite the German Secretary of State of the German Imperial Naval Office, Alfred von Tirpitz, to attend the event, as part of our previously established naval research pact, almost a decade into fruition.

As summer began the North Sea Pact Naval Exercise began, with Konow serving as supervisor of the event. The Danish delegation included King Frederick VIII, Vice Admiral Georg Carl Amdrup, commander Carl Hammerich, and several other commanders and officers. The Norwegian delegation featured King Haakon VII, on his first official foreign trip since his ascension as king, and was led by Chief of the Admiral Staff Alfred Berglund. Also present or participating in the drill from Norway was Rear Admiral Urban Jacob Rasmus Børresen, Minister of Defence Karl Friedrich Griffin Dawes, and fleet commanders Jakob von der Lippe, Edgar Otto, and Christian Sparre, who represented the Council of State Division in Stockholm. The feature of the event would be the HDMS Stjernebillede, a marvel of naval engineering as the sole dreadnought ship present at the drill. The event was also the unveiling of newly created Norwegian and Swedish ships designed in Denmark.

Military

Navy

The Royal Danish Navy (RDN), officially Kongelige Danske Marine in Danish, but more generally known as Søværnet, is the sea-based branch of the Danish Forsvaret. The RDN is mainly responsible for maritime defense and maintaining the sovereignty of Danish waters, and since the early twentieth century has expanded to be a major force in the North and Baltic Sea. Danish Navy ships carry the prefix KDM (Kongelige Danske Marine) in Danish, but this is translated to HDMS (His/Her Danish Majesty's Ship) in English. Individual ships are also referenced by number, with each ship having an individual code based on ship type.

Shipyards

Major

  • Aalborg
  • Svendborg
  • Copenhagen (x2)
  • Odense (x2)
  • Esbjerg

Minor

  • Reykjavík
  • Tórshavn

Organization

As of 1908 the Danish Royal Navy has been divided into two main fleets; the Storflåde (Grand Fleet), stationed in Copenhagen, and the Atlanterflade (Atlantic Fleet), stationed in Reykjavik. Each fleet is then divided into two task forces, which each consist of several squadrons. The navy is led by a head admiral, who answers directly to the Defense Minister, the head minister of all of Denmark's armed forces.

  • Storflåde (Grand Fleet) - Copenhagen
    • Task Force One
      • North Sea Squadron - Frederikshavn
        • HDMS Thyra
        • HDMS Stjernebillede
        • HDMS Slien
        • HDMS Dannebrog
        • HDMS Runesten
        • HDMS Møn
        • HDMS Grundlov
        • HDMS Rigsdagen
      • 3rd Undervandsbåd Eskadron (3rd Submarine Squadron)
        • HDMS Logi
        • HDMS Fornjótr
        • HDMS Eldir
        • HDMS Fimafeng
        • HDMS Ægir
      • 1st Destroyer Squadron - Copenhagen
        • HDMS Ragnarök
        • HDMS Bornholm
        • HDMS Surtr
        • HDMS Vafþrúðnismál
        • HDMS Gamleborg
      • 3rd Destroyer Squadron
        • HDMS Jörmungandr
        • HDMS Hammershus
        • HDMS Copenhagen
        • HDMS Aarhus
        • HDMS Odense
    • Task Force Two
      • Baltic Sea Squadron - Korsør
        • HDMS Danevirke
        • HDMS Østersøen
        • HDMS Sif
        • HDMS Kongeloven
        • HDMS Håndfæstning
      • 2nd Destroyer Squadron
        • HDMS Lilleborg
        • HDMS Bergbúa
        • HDMS Götterdämmerung
        • HDMS Gjallarhorn
        • HDMS Yggdrasil
      • 5th Destroyer Squadron
        • HDMS Randers
        • HDMS Kolding
        • HDMS Horsens
        • HDMS Reykjavík
        • HDMS Kópavogur
      • 4th Undervandsbåd Eskadron (4th Submarine Squadron)
        • HDMS Hymir
        • HDMS Nidavellir
        • HDMS Reidmar
        • HDMS Fafner
        • HDMS Odder
        • HDMS Regin
      • 6th Destroyer Squadron
        • HDMS Hafnarfjörður
        • HDMS Akureyri
        • HDMS Keflavík
        • HDMS Garðabær
        • HDMS Mosfellsbær
  • Atlanterflade (Atlantic Fleet) - Reykjavik
    • Task Force Three
      • Island Eskadron (Iceland Squadron) - Reykjavik
        • HDMS Volmerslaget
        • HDMS Orlogsflag
        • HDMS Lolland
        • HDMS Funen
        • HDMS Glavendrupstenen
        • HDMS Hedeby-stenene
        • HDMS Hærulfstenen
      • Grønland Eskadron (Greenland Squadron) - Nuuk
        • HDMS Jellingstenene
        • HDMS Rydsgårdstenen
      • Arktis Eskadron (Arctic Squadron) - Tórshavn
        • HDMS Snoldelevstenen
      • HDMS Falster
      • 1st Undervandsbåd Eskadron (1st Submarine Squadron) - Kópavogur
        • HDMS Unnr
        • HDMS Kólga
        • HDMS Hrönn
        • HDMS Himinglæva
        • HDMS Hefring
        • HDMS Dúfa
      • 4th Destroyer Eskadron (4th Destroyer Squadron) -
        • HDMS Aalborg
        • HDMS Frederiksberg, Esbjerg, Gentofte, and Gladsaxe
    • Task Force Four
      • Vestindien Eskadron (West Indies Squadron) - Amalienborg
        • HDMS Sjælland, Jylland, and Fyn
      • 2nd Undervandsbåd Eskadron (2nd Submarine Squadron) - Christiansted
        • HDMS Bylgja
        • HDMS Blóðughadda
        • HDMS Bára
        • HDMS Rán
        • HDMS Kári



















.

Ship Composition

# Name Laid Down Launched Commissioned Class Status
Dreadnought Battleships
B007 Stjernebillede 1903 1904 1904 Stjernebillede-class Active Service
B008 Thyra 1908 1909 1910 Thyra-classa Active Service
B009 Danevirke 1909 1910 1911 Thyra-classa Active Service
B010 Slien 1910 1911 1912 Thyra-classa Active Service
Battlecruisers
B011 Surtr 1912 1913 1914 Surtr-class Active Service
B012 Eldjötnar 1912 1913 1914 Surtr-class Active Service
Pre-dreadnought Battleships
B001 Dannebrog 1900 1903 1903 Dannebrog-class Active Service
B002 Volmerslaget 1901 1904 1904 Dannebrog-class Active Service
B003 Orlogsflag 1901 1904 1904 Dannebrog-class Active Service
B004 Korstog 1901 1904 1904 Dannebrog-classa Sold to Greece (1911)
B005 Østersøen 1901 1904 1904 Dannebrog-classa Active Service
B006 Sif 1901 1904 1904 Wilhelm-classa Active Service
Destroyers
D001 Ragnarök 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-class Active Service
D002 Bornholm 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-class Active Service
D003 Surtr 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-class Active Service
D004 Vafþrúðnismál 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-class Active Service
D005 Gamleborg 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D006 Lilleborg 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D007 Bergbúa 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D008 Götterdämmerung 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D009 Gjallarhorn 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D010 Yggdrasil 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D011 Jörmungandr 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D012 Hammershus 1901 1902 1902 Ragnarök-classb Active Service
D013 Copenhagen 1906 1907 1907 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D014 Aarhus 1906 1907 1907 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D015 Odense 1906 1907 1907 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D016 Aalborg 1906 1907 1907 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D017 Frederiksberg 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D018 Esbjerg 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D019 Gentofte 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D020 Gladsaxe 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D021 Randers 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D022 Kolding 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D023 Horsens 1907 1908 1908 Copenhagen-class Active Service
D024 Reykjavík 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D025 Kópavogur 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D026 Hafnarfjörður 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D027 Akureyri 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D028 Keflavík 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D029 Garðabær 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
D030 Mosfellsbær 1915 1916 1916 Reykjavík-class Active Service
Light Cruisers
C007 Sjælland 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C008 Jylland 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C009 Fyn 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C010 Lolland 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C011 Funen 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C012 Falster 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C013 Møn 1904 1905 1905 Sjælland-class Active Service
C014 Grundlov 1906 1907 1907 Grundlov-class Active Service
C015 Rigsdagen 1906 1907 1907 Grundlov-class Active Service
C016 Kongeloven 1906 1907 1907 Grundlov-class Active Service
C017 Håndfæstning 1906 1907 1907 Grundlov-class Active Service
C018 Runesten 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C019 Glavendrupstenen 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C020 Hedeby-stenene 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C021 Hærulfstenen 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C022 Jellingstenene 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C023 Rydsgårdstenen 1908 1909 1909 Runesten-class Active Service
C024 Snoldelevstenen 1909 1910 1910 Runesten-class Active Service
Protected Cruisers
C001 Viking 1901 1902 1903 Viking-classc Sold to Greece (1911)
C002 Væringjar 1901 1902 1903 Viking-classc Sold to Greece (1911)
C003 Snaefell 1902 1903 1903 Viking-class Sold to Norway (1911)
C004 Jelling 1902 1903 1903 Viking-class Sold to Norway (1911)
C005 Gorm 1902 1903 1903 Viking-class Sold to Norway (1911)
C006 Erobring 1902 1903 1903 Viking-class Sold to Norway (1911)
Submarines
U001 Ægir 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U002 Fimafeng 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U003 Eldir 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U004 Fornjótr 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U005 Logi 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U006 Kári 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U007 Rán 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U008 Bára 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U009 Blóðughadda 1903 1904 1904 Ægir-class Active Service
U010 Bylgja 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U011 Dúfa 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U012 Hefring 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U012 Himinglæva 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U013 Hrönn 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U014 Kólga 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U015 Unnr 1905 1906 1906 Ægir-class Active Service
U016 Hymir 1909 1910 1910 Ægir-class Active Service
U017 Hroðr 1909 1910 1910 Ægir-class Sold to Greece (1912)
U018 Gerðr 1909 1910 1910 Ægir-class Sold to Greece (1912)
U019 Nidavellir 1912 1913 1913 Nidavellir-class Active Service
U020 Reidmar 1912 1913 1913 Nidavellir-class Active Service
U021 Fafner 1912 1913 1913 Nidavellir-class Active Service
U022 Odder 1912 1913 1913 Nidavellir-class Active Service
U023 Regin 1912 1913 1913 Nidavellir-class Active Service
Andvari Nidavellir-class
Andvaranaut Nidavellir-class
Lyngheidr Nidavellir-class
Lofnheidr Nidavellir-class
A.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Battleships B004 through B008 constructed by Germany.
B.^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Destroyers D005 through D012 constructed by Germany.
C.^ ^ Cruisers C001 through C002 constructed by Italy.

Government

The Kingdom of Denmark is a constitutional monarchy, in which King Frederick VIII is the head of state. The monarch officially retains executive power and presides over the Council of State.

Territory

DenmarkNumbered
Greenland TE v. CP (SVG)
Map-kommunur-foroya-2009
Regions of Iceland
Name Capital Type of entity Population (1900) Total Area (km²)
Denmark Copenhagen Entire Country 2,432,000 42,915.7
1 Copenhagen Municipality (Part of) Copenhagen Municipality
2 Frederiksberg Municipality Frederiksberg Municipality
3 Copenhagen County Glostrup County
4 Frederiksborg County Hillerød County
5 Roskilde County Roskilde County
6 West Zealand County Sorø County
7 Storstrøm County Nykøbing County
8 Funen County Odense County
9 South Jutland County Aabenraa County
10 Ribe County Ribe County
11 Vejle County Vejle County
12 Ringkjøbing County Ringkøbing County
13 Viborg County Viborg County
14 North Jutland County Ålborg County
15 Aarhus County Århus County
16 Bornholm Rønne Regional Municipality
Greenland Nuuk Entire territory 12,000 2,166,086
Kujalleq Qaqortoq Municipality
Qaasuitsup Ilulissat Municipality
Qeqqata Sisimiut Municipality
Sermersooq Nuuk Municipality
Ittoqqortoormiit Ittoqqortoormiit Municipality
Faroe Islands Nuuk Entire territory 15,230 1,399
Østerø Fuglefjord Sýsla 286.3
Norderøerne Klaksvig Sýsla 241.7
Sandø Sandur Sýsla 125
Strømø Tórshavn Sýsla 373
Suderø Víkarbyrgi Sýsla 163.7
Vågø Midvåg Sýsla 176
Iceland Reykjavík Entire territory 78,000 103,000
Höfuðborgarsvæði Reykjavík Region 1,062
Suðurnes Keflavík Region 829
Vesturland Akranes Region 9,554
Vestfirðir Ísafjörður Region 9,409
Norðurland vestra Sauðárkrók Region 12,737
Norðurland eystra Akureyri Region 21,968
Austurland Egilsstaðir Region 22,721
Suðurland Selfoss Region 24,526
Ishavet Territories Kortårby Entire territory <250 61,399
Svalbard Kortårby <200 61,022
Jan Mayen <50 377
Dansk Vestindien Amalienborg Entire territory 25,000 400
Sankt Thomas Amalienborg 110
Sankt Jan 110
Sankt Croix Christiansted 260



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