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Democratic Party presidential primaries of 2012 (SIADD)

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Democratic presidential primaries of 2012

Previous election
2008 ← 
Next election
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January 3, 2012 to June 5, 2012
Howard Dean Hillary Rodham Clinton 2 Janet Napolitano
Nominee Howard Dean Hillary Clinton Janet Napolitano
Party Democratic Democratic Democratic
Home state Vermont New York Arizona
States carried 41 + D.C. 7 2
Percentage 78.04% 15.36% 6.6%

Democratic Party presidential primaries results 2012 (SIADD)

Results of the 2012 Democratic Party primaries and caucuses
Blue denotes a state won by Howard Dean.
Yellow denotes a state won by Hillary Clinton.
Orange denotes a state won by Janet Napolitano.

Incumbent Democratic
presidential candidate

Barack Obama
Democratic
presidential candidate-elect

Howard Dean
To Be Determined

The 2012 Democratic presidential primaries and caucuses is the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party will choose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2012 U.S. presidential election. There are 2,778 delegates, and a candidate must accumulate 1,390 delegate votes to win. The primary elections and caucuses will culminate in the 2012 Democratic National Convention held from September 3 through September 6, in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The primary contest began with a fairly wide field, and was the first presidential primary affected by a Supreme Court ruling that allowed unlimited fundraising for candidates through super PACs. Two candidates who ran in 2008, Senator Hillary Clinton of New York and former Congressman Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, and one candidate who ran in 2004, former governor and former DNC chairman Howard Dean of Vermont, also ran in 2012.

Dean took an early lead in polls with the support of much of the Democratic establishment, performing strongly in most polls and leading the field in fund-raising. However, his lead over the Democratic field has been precarious, due to the entry of Hillary Clinton, Mark Warner and Janet Napolitano. The field would split between anti-war candidates that wanted to withdraw U.S. forces from Afghanistan (Dean and Kucinich) and those in favour of continued presence (Clinton, Warner and Napolitano).

CandidatesEdit

Candidate Most recent office held
at the end of the primaries
Pledged delegate
vote estimate
Superdelegate
vote estimate
Total delegate
vote estimate
Campaign status
Howard Dean
Dean, HowardHoward Dean
Former U.S. Governor,
Vermont
3121
(64.67%)
610
(84.0%)
3731 Nominee
Surpassed by estimation
the 2,778 delegate votes
needed for a majority,
April 12, 2012.
Hillary Clinton official Secretary of State portrait crop
Clinton, HillaryHillary Clinton
U.S. Senator,
New York
1,286 90
(12.4%)
1376 Suspended,
April 10, 2012.
Endorsed Dean,
April 12, 2012. Named VP candidate,
August 21, 2012.
Janet Napolitano
Napolitano, JanetJanet Napolitano
U.S. Governor
Arizona
419 26
(3.6%)
445 Suspended,
March 9, 2012.
Endorsed Dean,
May 14, 2012.
Evan Bayh
Bayh, EvanEvan Bayh
U.S. Senator,
Indiana
0 0 0 Withdrew,
February 8, 2012.
Endorsed Dean,
June 22, 2012.
Mark Warner
Warner, MarkMark Warner
U.S. Senator,
Virginia
0 0 0 Withdrew,
March 2, 2012.
Endorsed Dean,
March 26, 2012.
Alan Grayson official Congressional portrait
Grayson, Alan/span>Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative,
Florida
0 0 0 Withdrew,
January 12, 2012.
Endorsed Dean
May 7, 2012.
Dennis Kucinich
Kucinich, DennisDennis Kucinich
U.S. Representative,
Ohio
0 0 0 Withdrew,
February 28, 2012.
Endorsed Dean
February 30, 2012.
Martin O'Malley
O'Malley, MartinMartin O'Malley
U.S. Governor,
Maryland
0 0 0 Withdrew,
January 10, 2012.
Endorsed Dean,
March 21, 2012.

Election cycleEdit

The beginning (2011)Edit

Media speculation began almost immediately after the results of the 2008 presidential elections became known. In the 2010 midterm elections, the Democrats suffered a defeat in the House of Representatives while keeping the majority in the Senate. Early polls taken before anyone had announced a candidacy had shown Senator Hillary Clinton and Former Chairman of the Democratic Party Howard Dean as the most popular potential Democratic candidates. Nevertheless, the media speculated on several other candidates, including Barack Obama, the Democratic candidate in the 2008 election; former U.S. Senator Tom Daschle and Chairman of the Democratic Party Tim Kain.

Howard Dean was the first to formally announce his candidacy for the presidency, on April 23, 2011. This run would be his second attempt at the presidency. While having supported the troop surge in Afghanistan in 2009, he had by 2011 returned to his non-interventionist roots from his 2004 presidential campaign and challenged McCain on his refusal to put an arbitrary date of withdrawal from Afghanistan and his military operations in Yemen.

On May 21, 2011, Hillary Clinton joined the race on a platform similar to the one she ran on in 2008.

Early states (January to March)Edit

 % Can show a plurality of delegates
  • The numbers for delegates, states, and districts won in these tables include results from local conventions held in states which did not allocate their delegates at the precinct caucuses or primary election. These conventions were generally held on dates later than the table indicates.
Early states results
Candidates:

Evan Bayh

Evan
Bayh

Hillary Rodham Clinton 2

Hillary
Clinton

Howard Dean

Howard
Dean

Dennis Kucinich

Dennis
Kucinich

Janet Napolitano

Janet Napolitano

Mark Warner

Mark
Warner

Alan Grayson official Congressional portrait

Alan
Grayson

Martin O'Malley

Martin
O'Malley
Delegates won 0 315 395 0 95 17 0 0
States won 0 2 5 0 1 0 0 0
Jan. 3 Flag of Iowa Iowa
Caucus
3% 31% 39% 2% 6% 18% 1% 0%
Jan. 10 Flag of New Hampshire New Hampshire
Primary
5% 30% 31% 2% 4% 26% 1% 1%
Jan. 21 Flag of Nevada Nevada
Caucus
4% 30% 25% 3% 35% 4%
Jan. 28 Flag of South Carolina South Carolina
Primary
5% 45% 32% 2% 13% 2%
Jan. 31 Flag of Florida Florida
Nonbinding primary
2% 33% 36% 4% 15% 10%
Feb. 7 Flag of Minnesota Minnesota
Nonbinding caucus
7% 21% 50% 3% 19%
Flag of Missouri Missouri
Primary
8% 45% 27% 11% 9%
Feb. 28 Flag of Michigan Michigan
Primary
41% 43% 6% 10%

Super Tuesday (March 6)Edit

Super Tuesday
Candidates:

Hillary Rodham Clinton 2

Hillary
Clinton

Howard Dean

Howard
Dean

Janet Napolitano

Janet Napolitano
Delegates won 439 1,130 324
States won 2 9 2
Mar. 6
Super Tuesday
Flag of Arizona Arizona
Caucuses
17% 40% 43%
Flag of California California
Primary
16% 66% 18%
Flag of Colorado Colorado
Caucus
17% 39% 43%
Flag of Georgia (U.S. state) Georgia
Primary
37% 36% 27%
Flag of Massachusetts Massachusetts
Primary
38% 52% 10%
Flag of New Jersey New Jersey
Primary
18% 66% 16%
Flag of North Carolina North Carolina
Primary
17% 67% 16%
Flag of Ohio Ohio
Primary
31% 58% 11%
Flag of Oklahoma Oklahoma
Primary
40% 37% 18%
Flag of Tennessee Tennessee
Primary
35% 43% 22%
Flag of Texas Texas
Primary
17% 65% 18%
Flag of Virginia Virginia
Primary
32% 69% 9%
Flag of Vermont Vermont
Primary
21% 65% 14%

March to AprilEdit

Early states results
Candidates:

Hillary Rodham Clinton 2

Hillary
Clinton

Howard Dean

Howard
Dean
Delegates won 532 805
States won 3 8 + D.C. + DA
Mar. 13 Flag of Alabama Alabama
Primary
25% 75%
Flag of Mississippi Mississippi
Primary
54% 46%
Flag of Utah Utah
Caucus
36% 64%
Mar. 20 Flag of Illinois Illinois
Primary
34% 66%
Mar. 24 Flag of Louisiana Louisiana
Primary
35% 65%
Apr. 3 Flag of Washington, D.C. District of Columbia
Primary
37% 63%
Flag of Maryland Maryland
Primary
32% 68%
Flag of Wisconsin Wisconsin
Primary
43% 57%
Apr. 5–10 Democrats Abroad Logo Democrats Abroad
Primary
26% 74%
Apr. 12 Flag of Connecticut Connecticut
Primary
36% 64%
Flag of New York New York
Primary
56% 44%
Flag of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania
Primary
26% 74%
Flag of Rhode Island Rhode Island
Primary
63% 37%

On April 8, Dean rolled out about forty superdelegate endorsements. Those endorsements, combined with the projected number of pledged delegates Dean would win in the Pennsylvania primary, put him well over the "magic number" of 2,778 early in the evening. All major news organizations had announced that Dean had clinched the Democratic nomination and Dean claimed the status of presumptive nominee in a speech in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Clinton conceded the nomination later that evening, saying that the party now should focus on defeating McCain. On April 10, Clinton endorsed Dean.

Final resultEdit

See alsoEdit

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