Alternate History

Age of the Sea Dragons (Sea Dragons)

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Written By Dr. Wong professor of history from the Guangzhou University of Social Sciences, produced in 1996 translated into English 1999.


The Age of The Sea Dragons lies deep in the memory of the Sinosphere and indeed the world for diverse reasons. Economically and socially the order insular middle kingdoms was broken down and replaced with modernity. For decades historians have argued from different sides on the relevance of Sea Dragon piracy in transforming coital East Asia. Regardless Sea Dragon piracy opened a new dawn, traumatically through violence and disorder.

This piece The Age of the Sea Dragons is about defining just who and what consists of a Sea Dragon as the term has sometimes been used vary widely to identify any vaguely oriental outlaw with nautical actives. The origins of the Sea Dragons will be explored as well their culture and their way of life. Contrary to popular perception Sea Dragons were not a single nationality and quite often had origins from Austronesian peoples as much as they had Chinese, Korean or Japanese ancestry. Under particular scrutiny will be viewing the role of Sea Dragons not just as raiders but also of explorers and colonizers. Some of those termed Sea Dragons even engaged in what could be called interstate activity and were viewed by Europeans as state powers that had to be dealt with in the view of international relations as opposed to just being criminals.

The farthest overreaching consequence of Sea Dragons was the resulting acceleration of biological and technological diffusion. In the chaos that accompanied the rise of the Sea Dragons technologies religions and crops transmitted between the East and West and on a more equal playing field compared to turn of the 16th centuries, when Europeans had been proactive but not oriental hermit kingdoms. Sea Dragons too introduced new diseases and crops in the ensuing exploration of Oceania.

Defining Sea Dragons

Unfortunately as Sea Dragons have enjoyed a resurgence in the public eye their identity has become unclear and confused. With thousands of years of piracy on China's coast there has been a tendency to lump any individual in under the Sea Dragon term. Even in the scholastic community there has been confusion between Sea Dragons and the earlier Wokou that existed from the 14th to 16th centuries. Wokou bared many similarities to Sea Dragons, because Sea Dragons grew from the Wokou legacy which had declined by the mid-late 16th century. Wokou can best be defined as a reactions to the strict trade climate and the bureaucratic culture that denied opportunities to many enterprising people from all social classes. Wokou with the exception of routes in the Bohai sea kept to their home coast lines. The best such pirates could hope for would be to aggravate the coastal economy to the point where officials would bribe such pirates and grant their amnesty for retiring from banditry. However to many amnesty and money would not alone lead to an elevation of social status and could completely satisfy their reasons for resorting to piracy in the first place. This strategy particular of Ming placation was unique to the Middle Kingdom in contrast to Europeans who either sent pirates to attack other countries or stamp it out all together. As the Ming Dynasty declined placating pirates became more ineffective.

The Sea Dragons were born with a new thirst for coastal Chinese to settle overseas lands for the first time in China's history. Amazingly even though Chinese had traveled to the southern islands for at least three thousand years it was only in the 16th century that anyone from China set out to conquer them. The excessive Isolationism and bureaucracy of the Ming indeed deprived many Chinese of possible advancement of the growing global economy of the 16th century. An independent spirit developed, firmly apart from the central state that led to the explosion of piracy at the turn of the 17th century, Lim Hong himself- often called the first sea dragon is a reflection of his time. Tens of thousands of ambitious young men would set their chances to a life at sea, in far flung lands and vice. With this in mind a formal definition for Sea Dragons can be made

- Pirates mostly originating from the shores of the South China Sea between the 16th and 18th century that sailed from the Indian Ocean through the South Pacific and established settlements which created the foundation of the Pacific trade network.

Vessels and Battle Tactics



Beasts at sea- Life on the water

As rulers of small worlds- Life on the land

Brief History

First Generation


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