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250px-1994 World Series
The 1994 World Series matched the Chicago White Sox (97–65) of the American League against the Los Angeles Dodgers (88–74) of the National League. Chicago won the series in six games.

The two teams previously met in the 1959 World Series, which was won by Los Angeles in six games in their first world series championship since moving to Los Angeles from Brooklyn. For Los Angeles, this was their first world series appearance in six years and their 19th overall. For Chicago, this was their first world series appearance in thirty five years and their 5th overall. Also, for Chicago, this was their first world series championship since 1917, breaking a 77 year championship drought. Frank Thomas was named the World Series MVP.


Background

Los Angeles Dodgers

The Los Angeles Dodgers won the NL West. They made it to the series by beating the Montreal Expos in five games in the National League Division Series, and the Atlanta Braves in six games in the National League Championship Series.

Chicago White Sox

The Chicago White Sox won the newly formed AL Central. They made it to the series by beating the Texas Rangers in three games in the American League Division Series, and the New York Yankees in six games in the American League Championship Series.

Summary AL Chicago White Sox (4) vs. NL Los Angeles Dodgers (2)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance

1 October 22 Los Angeles Dodgers – 2, Chicago White Sox – 3 Comiskey Park (II) 2:42 45,862

2 October 23 Los Angeles Dodgers – 6, Chicago White Sox – 2 Comiskey Park (II) 3:12 46,256

3 October 25 Chicago White Sox – 2, Los Angeles Dodgers – 7 Dodger Stadium 2:56 55,923

4 October 26 Chicago White Sox – 7, Los Angeles Dodgers – 4 Dodger Stadium 3:06 56,010

5 October 27 Chicago White Sox – 6, Los Angeles Dodgers – 3 Dodger Stadium 3:20 56,072

6 October 29 Los Angeles Dodgers – 1, Chicago White Sox – 6 Comiskey Park (II) 3:16 46,725


Matchups

Game 1 Saturday, October 22, 1994 6:20 pm (CDT) at Comiskey Park (II) in Chicago, Illinois

In Game 1, Ramon Martinez and Wilson Alvarez would be the starters. Playing in their first World Series game since 1959, Chicago took an early lead with an RBI single from Julio Franco to start off 1-0. Los Angeles would get on the board in the third inning with an RBI by Mike Piazza to make the score 1-1. The score would remain that way until the bottom of the seventh inning, after Lance Johnson and Tim Raines got back to back singles, Frank Thomas came to the plate and hit a triple, driving in two runs to make it a 3-1 lead for Chicago. Los Angeles would get an RBI from Tim Wallach to make it 3-2, but that was all they would get as Roberto Hernandez came on the mound for Chicago in the ninth inning to get the save and the win to give Chicago a 1-0 series lead.

Game 2 Sunday, October 23, 1994 6:20 pm (CDT) at Comiskey Park (II) in Chicago, Illinois

Kevin Gross and Jason Bere were the starters for Game 2. Los Angeles would get on the board first in the first inning. After the first two men got on base, singles by Tim Wallach and Mitch Webster drove in two runs to make it 2-0 for Los Angeles. Wallach drove in another run in the fifth inning to make it a 3-0 lead. Both teams traded off home runs in the eighth inning, with Webster hitting a solo home run into center field to make it 4-0, and Julio Franco hitting a two run home run into center field to make it a 4-2 game. In the ninth inning, Mike Piazza hit a two run home run into left center field to give Los Angeles a 6-2 lead. Todd Worrell would come on the mound to retire the side and get the save to even the series at 1-1.

Game 3 Tuesday, October 25, 1994 5:20 pm (PDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

As the series shifted to Los Angeles for Game 3, the matchup would be between Alex Fernandez and Tom Candiotti. Los Angeles would get on the board first as Mike Piazza hit a triple to bring in a run and make it 1-0. Raul Mondesi would hit a three run home run into right center field in the third inning to give Los Angeles a 4-0 lead. Ozzie Guillen would put Chicago on the board in the top half of the fifth inning with an RBI to make the score 4-1. In the bottom half of that inning, Los Angeles would score three runs. With the bases loaded, Eric Karros would hit a single to drive in two runs, and Rafael Bournigal also got a single to drive in the run and Los Angeles would take a 7-1 lead. Joey Cora would get an RBI for Chicago to make it a 7-2 game. Tom Candiotti would pitch a complete game and give Los Angeles the win. Los Angeles would have the series lead 2-1.

Game 4 Wednesday, October 26, 1994 5:20 pm (PDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

The starters for Game 4 would be Jack McDowell and Orel Hershiser. Chicago would get on the board in the first inning with Frank Thomas hitting a two run home run off the leftfield foulpole for a 2-0 lead. Later that inning Darrin Jackson would hit a solo home run to left field to give Chicago a 3-0 lead. Los Angeles got on the board with Brett Butler getting an RBI single to make it 3-1. It would remain that way until the fifth inning, when Robin Ventura hit a two run home run into left center field to make it a 5-1 lead for Chicago. Another RBI from Los Angeles made it a 5-2 game. Joey Cora singled in an RBI in the eighth inning to make it 6-2. Los Angeles drove in two runs later that inning to make it a 6-4 game. Chicago would get an insurance run in the ninth inning to go up 7-4. Roberto Hernandez came on the mound to get the save and the win for Chicago and even the series at 2-2.

Game 5 Thursday, October 27, 1994 5:20 pm (PDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

In Game 5, Chicago would get on the board first as Frank Thomas drove in a run to make it 1-0. They would get two more runs in the third inning to make it a 3-0 game. Los Angeles would get on the board later that inning with singles by Brett Butler and Mike Piazza to drive in two runs to make it 3-2. The score would remain 3-2 Chicago until the seventh inning when Thomas drove in another run to give Chicago a 4-2 lead. Another run by Los Angeles in the eighth inning made it a 4-3 game. Thomas once again came up big and hit a two run home run to center field in the ninth inning to give Chicago a 6-3 lead. Chicago closed out the ninth inning and would get the win and lead the series 3-2.

Game 6 Saturday, October 29, 1994 6:20 pm (CDT) at Comiskey Park (II) in Chicago, Illinois

October 29 was the latest end date ever for a World Series until 2001, when the World Series, which was delayed by 9/11 related postponements, ran from October 27 to November 4. In Game 6, Chicago would get on the board first. After Lance Johnson and Tim Raines walked, Frank Thomas came up to the plate and hit a three run home run into left center field to give Chicago an early 3-0 lead. Raines would hit a sacrifice fly to drive in a run in the second inning to make it 4-0. Raul Mondesi would single in a run for Los Angeles in the fourth inning to make the score 4-1. Lance Johnson would hit a solo home run down the right field line for Chicago to make it a 5-1 game. Thomas would drive in another run in the seventh inning by getting a single to give Chicago a 6-1 lead. Jason Bere would pitch a complete game for Chicago, as Tim Wallach grounded out to second base for the final out of the game and the Chicago White Sox would win the World Series in six games. With the 4-2 series win, it was their first World series championship in 77 years. After Game 6, then-Executive Committee Chairman Bud Selig presided over the Commissioner's trophy presentation for the first time. In the previous two World Series (1992 and 1993), American League president Dr. Bobby Brown presided over the trophy presentation. Selig would become the Commissioner of baseball in 1998.

Broadcasting

ABC Televised the world series this year. Al Michaels (play-by-play), Jim Palmer (color commentary) and Tim McCarver (color commentary), called the action on ABC. John Saunders served as pre-game host for ABC's coverage of the World Series. Serving as field reporters for ABC were Rick Dempsey (in the Dodgers' dugout) and Lesley Vissler (in the White Sox's dugout.) This was one of two World Series (the other was 1995) to be produced under the "Baseball Network" umbrella (a revenue sharing joint venture between Major League Baseball, ABC and NBC). In July 1995, both networks announced that they would be pulling out of what was supposed to be a six-year-long venture. NBC would next cover the 1997 and 1999 World Series over the course of a five-year-long contract, in which Fox would cover the World Series in even numbered years (1996, 1998 and 2000).

The national radio broadcast was provided by CBS, with Vin Scully and Jeff Torborg on the call. Locally, the series was called on KABC (AM) in Los Angeles, In Chicago, the series was called on WMAQ (AM).

Aftermath

The Chicago White Sox would not return to the playoffs again until 2000, when they were swept by the Seattle Mariners in three games in the ALDS. They would return to the World Series in 2005, where they swept the Houston Astros in four games.

The Los Angeles Dodgers would return to the postseason the next season and the season after that, only to be swept in three games by the Cincinnati Reds and the Atlanta Braves respectively in the NLDS. They would not return to the World Series again until 2017, where they faced the Houston Astros (they moved to the American League in 2013), and lost in seven games.

Series quotes "There's a groundball over to second base, the throw to first, he's out. For the first time since 1917, the Chicago White Sox are world champions." -Al Michaels calling the final out of Game 6 of the World Series between the Dodgers and White Sox.

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