Fandom

Alternate History

1980 U.S Presidential Election (Kennedy 1980)

40,505pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Talk0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.


‹ 1976 Flag of the United States 1984 ›
U.S Presidential Election 1980
November 4th, 1980
Bandicam 2015-09-07 10-39-24-708 Official Portrait of President Reagan 1981 John Bayard Anderson
Nominee Ted Kennedy Ronald Reagan John Anderson
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Home state Massachusetts California Illinois
Running mate Jerry Brown Bob Dole Patrick Lucey
Electoral vote 291 247 0
States carried 27+D.C 23 0
Bandicam 2015-09-13 18-25-00-838
Incumbent President before election
Jimmy Carter
Democratic
Elected President
Ted Kennedy
Democratic

The 1980 Presidential Election was held on November 4th, 1980. The election featured a high powered match-up between two rising starts in the Democratic and Republican Party: 3 Term Democratic Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy and Former Republican California Governor and Actor Ronald Reagan. 10 Term Illinois Republican John Anderson also ran as an Independent after being defeated by Reagan in the Primaries. The election was dominated by the Iran Hostage Crisis, Skyrocketing Energy Prices, Unemployment and Inflation and the Soviet Union's military actions in Afghanistan.

The Incumbent Democratic President, Jimmy Carter, ran for a 2nd Term in office despite his very low approval ratings. While it's rare for a President to face a challenge from his own party, Carter ended up receiving substantial opposition from the more liberal wing of the party. Carter initially faced one challenger: 4 Term Wisconsin Senator William Proxmire., but after public polling showing Carter heavily vulnerable, 2 Term California Governor Jerry Brown and 2 Term New York Governor Hugh Carey, fresh off their 1978 re-election victories, decided to run. Polls showed a horse race between the 4. Liberal Activists and Unions tried persuading Senator Ted Kennedy to run, who was initially reluctant to run, but would be seen as the front runner if he were to run. After polls show that Kennedy would be a heavy favorite against President Carter, Kennedy decided to run. Kennedy campaigned as the prohibitive front-runner, but struggled to cement his image as the eventual nominee, particularly because Conservative Democrats strongly opposed Kennedy, primarily because they saw him as too liberal. President Carter was forced to run an insurgent campaign as he did in 1976, but ultimately was unable to beat Ted Kennedy, and Kennedy was effectively handed the nomination in June 1980 after President Carter and all other challengers had dropped out.

The Republican Primary was more quiet: Former California Governor Ronald Reagan was the early front-runner for the nomination in his third and what was speculated to be his last bid for the White House. Reagan consistently hled a comfortable lead over the GOP Field, with his chief rivals rotating between Former CIA Director George H.W Bush, Former Texas Governor John Conally and Senate Minority Leader Howard Baker of Tennessee. Illinois Congressman John Anderson also ran in an attempt to be the leading Liberal Republican Candidate against Reagan, who some Republicans saw as too conservative, but ultimately dropped out to pursue an Independent run. Bush established himself as Bush's chief rival after Iowa, but he was never able to really gain on Reagan, who grew his lead after winning primary after primary, eventually forcing all his rivals out of the race and locking up the nomination by May 1980.

The General Election was heavily contested, nasty, and close: negative advertisements dominated the airwaves and scandals rocked both candidates. Reagan consistently tried to link Kennedy to the outgoing unpopular Carter Administration while Kennedy attacked Reagan for being too conservative and for his handling of the Berkeley Protests while he was Governor of California. Additionally, Illinois Congressman John Anderson campaigned as a potential spoiler and campaigned as a middle of the road kind of guy, but was mostly seen a protest candidate for more moderate voters. Anderson's candidacy was predicted to take more votes from Reagan then Kennedy

At 11:02 PM EST, Ted Kennedy was declared the winner over Ronald Reagan after winning several key battle ground states by close margins. Republicans mostly pinned the lost on Anderson, who effectively drew too many much need votes from Reagan. It was found that it was mostly Moderate and Liberal Republicans that voted for Anderson, and analysts showed that if Anderson's support had gone to Reagan, Reagan would've successfully defeated Kennedy.

Democratic Primary

Candidates for the Democratic Nomination:

  • Ted Kennedy, Senator of Massachusetts since 1962 (Nominee)
  • Jimmy Carter, President of the United States since 1981
  • Jerry Brown, Governor of California since 1975
  • Hugh Carey, Governor of New York since 1975
  • William Proxmire, Senator of Wisconsin since 1957


Campaign

From the start, President Carter was considered very vulnerable due to his low approval ratings and his handling of the Iranian Hostage Crisis and skyrocketing unemployment, inflation and energy prices, and the liberal wing of the Democratic Party tried to find a candidate who could beat Carter in the primary. Jimmy Carter announced his re-election bid in Early March of 1979. Carter's approval ratings at the timer have been drastically declining and several prominent Democratic figures had began openly discussing the possibility of replacing Carter on the ballot. Unions and Liberal Activists tried to persuading Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy into running, and he was initially reluctant, but during the summer of 1979 he emerged as a prominent Carter critic on the left. Carter was not intimidated despite his massive unpopularity, and said this about the prospect of Kennedy running: "If he runs, I'll whoop his ass". Despite that comment, hypothetical polling showed that democratic primary voters preferred Kennedy over Carter by a margin of 2 to 1. With Kennedy shaky on the prospect of running, some liberal activists began trying to persuade little known Liberal Wisconsin Senator William Proxmire to run. Proxmire was considered to be a longshot at best, but he ultimately announced that he would run in Mid-May of 1979. Carter said he didn't really care that he was being challenged, and said he would still be the eventual nominee. However. snap polls since Proxmire's announcement showed Carter only leading Proxmire by a 42%-33% margin. This sent shock-waves throughout the Democratic party as it showed that Carter was vulnerable and could be defeated. This set off a flurry of speculation on who would run, but some names rose above the rest. New York Governor Hugh Carey began openly entertaining the possibility of running, and positioned himself as the liberal with longer executive experience unlike Carter, and began contrasting his liberal record in New York with Carter's moderate record in Georgia, arguing that his liberal policies have left New York off better off. Carter countered by criticizing Carey's response to the energy crisis, and noted that New York had some of the longest lines for gas in the nation. Carey announced his candidacy in early June 1979. California Governor Jerry Brown, who had formed an exploratory committee around the time of Proxmire's announcement, saw that the 3 way race between Carter, Proxmire and Carey was a deadheat, decided to jump in Mid-June 1979. Brown tried to reach out to disenfranchised Carter voters while also trying to appeal the more liberal wing of the party, and ran on his liberal record in California. Polling between Carter, Proxmire, Carney and Brown was a virtual tie. This encouraged Kennedy has polls showed that he'd clear the field and become an instant front-runner, and with the substantial backing of unions, environmental groups, liberal activists that offered weak support to the other candidates and several key members of the Democratic Party, and with the blessing of his family, announced Mid-September 1979 after passing several times on a White House run, that now was the time and that he would indeed run. Kennedy did face questions about the Chappaquiddick Incident, but for the most part he was able to handle questions about it pretty well and it mostly died down following his announcement. Polling in Early October showed Kennedy as the dominant front-runner, with him appealing to more traditional Democratic areas and to people who had higher education and benefited greatly from the middle class supporting him as they were disfranchised with Carter. However, Kennedy struggled to appeal to minorities and Conservative and Moderate Democrats and minorities, which backed Carter for the most part. What also hurt Kennedy is that Carter was the favorite in Iowa, and Kennedy knew he couldn't afford to do that badly in Iowa, but he well knew he could make up ground by winning Maine and New Hampshire by wide margins. Kennedy essentially campaigned as the inevitable nominee while Carter was forced to run an insurgent campaign against Kennedy. Brown, Carney and Proxmire mostly stayed in single digits, unable to move much as most of the race was focused on Carter and Kennedy. Carter began closing Kennedy's double digit lead in December 1979, and Carter began successfully pulling at least 30% in the polls by Mid-January. But for the most part Kennedy remained roughly 10 points ahead of Carter.The debates were marked by sharp exchanges between Carter and Kennedy, with Brown, Carey and Proxmire trying to get attention. Kennedy attacked Carter for his weak response to the Iranian Hostage Crisis and his poor handling of the economy. Carter blasted back in a more personal way, attacking Kennedy for his role in the Chappaquiddick Incident, something that Kennedy was able to mainly control at this point. Kennedy responded by saying "Mr. President, you're a broken record, and since you don't have a good one in the White House, all you can do is attack me for something that happened nearly 20 years ago, just let it go". Kennedy earned a standing ovation. But Kennedy faced a barrage of new questions from it, and was threatened on several occasions that he had to wear a bullet proof vest at times. Carter's campaign mostly focused on Iowa, banking on a strong showing, and his peanut farmer demeanor appealed to Iowan's despite his abysmal approval rating in the state. Kennedy's campaign hoped that Carter would only win by single digits, which would put doubt on the Carter's campaign and slow any momentum that they might get from an Iowa win. Carter ultimately won Iowa by about 11 points (47-36), but Kennedy followed up by crushing Carter in Maine (58-23) and in New Hampshire (54-35). At this point candidates began dropping out. Jerry Brown, who managed to consistently poll at 4% nationally and only won 5% in Iowa and Maine, was frustrated that he was unable to gain traction and dropped out, but he endorsed President Carter. This breathed in life to the struggling Carter campaign, and Carter successfully broke Kennedy's double digit lead and was only down to high single digits. This also benefited Carney and Proxmire's campaigns to an extent, who were at this point seen as protest candidates that didn't want Kennedy or Carter. Carney barley saw a bounce in his numbers, and frustrated that he couldn't do well in any states (his best showing was in Oklahoma where pulled 8%) decided to drop out and endorsed Kennedy. Proxmire also saw a slight bump in his numbers, but the thought was that Proxmire would drop out after his expected victory in the Wisconsin Primary. Proxmire easily won Wisconsin, and seeing no viable path to the nomination from there, dropped out and endorsed Kennedy the next week. At this point it was down to a Carter-Kennedy race, as it's always essentially been. Carter would crush Kennedy in the Southern, Mid-Western and Western Primaries (expect the West Coast states, Kennedy beat him there by large margins) while Kennedy would pound Carter in the New England and industrial states. However, Carter found ways to cut into Kennedy's plan: Carter embarrassed Kennedy by crushing him in Vermont by 2-1 and won Delware by 9 points. Kennedy knew he would need at least one southern state to win the nomination, but Carter was heavily favored in all the states expect one: North Carolina, where polling showed Kennedy with a good lead. Kennedy decided to go all out in North Carolina. With 2 weeks to go the NC Primary, Kennedy lead Carter 48-43, and grew his lead the next week 50-41. However, Carter invested in the ground game and surged in the final moments, taking a 47-45 lead a day to go. Kennedy campaigned aggressively in the suburban areas, trying to paint Carter's agenda as harmful to the middle class. Kennedy narrowly won North Carolina by a 50.3-49.7 margin. Carter considered a recount but did not go through with it. Kennedy celebrated the victory saying "We can appeal to the South". However, Carter would later embarrass Kennedy in Indiana, a state where he needed to win, but Carter was able to win over the farmer vote in Indiana, which propelled Carter to a narrow 50.6-49.4 win. Despite some of the setbacks, Kennedy regularly lead Carter by about 9-10 points nationally and benefited from a 400 lead delegate count over Carter by picking and choosing which states to compete in and how much effort would go in to win it or at least get a good showing. In June 1980, with days to go to the Missouri Primary, where Carter was expected to easily coast, Carter held a press conference the night before the Primary and said he was dropping out because of Kennedy's substantial delegate lead and sizable lead nationally. Carter knew that if he were to go the convention, he would be a long-shot at best despite him winning more states then Kennedy, so rather then get embarrassed at the convention (he'd be the first President to lose at a convention), Carter dropped out of the race, but did not endorse Kennedy. This marked the first time since Lyndon Johnson in 1968 that a President has lost his primary. Kennedy graciously accepted the nomination and went on to win Missouri unanimously, and said he'd put America back to work by using liberal polices correctly. Kennedy them began formulating a strategy for the General Election. A part of that strategy would be appealing to the south, something that he struggled to do against favorite son, President Jimmy Carter. Kennedy knew that Jerry Brown was able to appeal to some of Carter's base, but he couldn't completely guarantee that they'd show up for him unless Carter endorsed him, which was seen as unlikely and although he resented Brown for endorsing Carter, he selected him as his Vice Presidential Nominee.

Polling

Date

Jimmy Carter (Inc.)

Ted Kennedy

Jerry Brown

Hugh Carney

William Proxmire

October 2nd, 1979

27.3%

40.8%

4.2%

7.3%

5%

October 9th, 1979

26.9%

41.4%

4.4%

7.2%

5.1%

October 16th, 1979

27%

40.7%

4.2%

7.2%

5%

October 23rd, 1979

27%

41.2%

4.3%

7.2%

5.2%

October 30th, 1979

26.8%

40.9%

4.3%

7.3%

5.1%

November 6th, 1979

27.6%

40.3%

4.3%

7.4%

5.1%

November 13th, 1979

28%

40.3%

4.2%

7.4%

5.2%

November 20th, 1979

28.5%

40.1%

4.3%

7.2%

5.2%

November 27th, 1979

28.7%

40.9%

4.4%

7.3%

5.1%

December 4th, 1979

29%

41.4%

4.4%

6.9%

5.1%

December 11th, 1979

29.5%

40.9%

4.5%

7.2%

5%

December 18th, 1979

29.5%

40.8%

4.5%

7.4%

5.1%

December 25th, 1979

29.9%

40.3%

4.4%

7.5%

5.2%

January 1st, 1980

30.7%

40.2%

4.3%

7.4%

5%

January 8th, 1980

30%

41.2%

4.2%

7.2%

5%

January 15th, 1980

30.5%

40.4%

4.3%

7.2%

5.1%

January 22nd, 1980

30.1%

40.9%

4.4%

7.5%

5.1%

January 29th, 1980

30.2%

40.7%

4.5%

7.3%

5.1%

February 5th, 1980

30.3%

40.4%

4.3%

7.4%

5.1%

February 12th, 1980

30.2%

41.2%

4.5%

7%

5%

February 19th, 1980

33.4%

42.2%

Withdrew, endorsed Carter

7.3%

5.4%

February 26th, 1980

33.2%

42.2%

0%

7.8%

5.4%

March 4th, 1980

33.5%

42.7%

0%

7.4%

5.3%

March 11th, 1980

33.6%

43%

0%

7.7%

5.4%

March 18th, 1980

33.6%

44.6%

0%

7.8%

5.5%

March 25th, 1980

35.2%

48.8%

0%

Withdrew from the race, endorsed Kennedy

7%

April 1st, 1980

38.5%

48.5%

0%

0%

6.8%

April 8th, 1980

38.6%

48.8%

0%

0%

7.2%

April 15th, 1980

41%

49.6%

0%

0%

Withdrew from the race, Endorsed Kennedy

April 22nd, 1980

42.4%

51.9%

0%

0%

0%

April 29th, 1980

42.8%

52.7%

0%

0%

0%

May 6th, 1980

43.4%

52.4%

0%

0%

0%

May 13th, 1980

43.4%

52.9%

0%

0%

0%

May 20th, 1980

43.8%

53.1%

0%

0%

0%

May 27th, 1980

43.5%

53.9%

0%

0%

0%

June 3rd, 1980

44.2%

53.2%

0%

0%

0%

June 10h, 1980

45.2%

54.7%

0%

0%

0%

June 17th, 1980

Withdrew from Race, effectively handing Kennedy the nomination

56.2%

Primary and Caucus Results

State

Jimmy Carter (Inc.)

Ted Kennedy

Jerry Brown

Hugh Carney

William Proxmire

Alabama

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

Alaska

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

Arkansas

58.9%

41.1%

0%

0%

0%

Arizona

61.4%

38.6%

0%

0%

0%

California

41.7%

58.3%

Colorado

60.3%

39.7%

Connecticut

32.8%

60.3%

0%

0%

6.9%

Delaware

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

D.C

34%

66%

0%

0%

0%

Florida

54.1%

35.6%

0%

5.1%

5.1%

Georgia

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

Hawaii

33.2%

51.8%

0%

7.5%

7.5%

Idaho

61.7%

38.3%

0%

0%

0%

Illinois

28.5%

64.2%

0%

0%

7.4%

Indiana

50.6%

49.4%

0%

0%

0%

Iowa

47.4%

36.8%

5.3%

5.3%

5.3%

Kansas

54.7%

38.9%

0%

0%

6.3%

Kentucky

59%

41%

0%

0%

0%

Louisiana

54.6%

39.1%

0%

0%

6.4%

Maine

23.5%

58.8%

5.9%

5.9%

5.9%

Maryland

37.2%

62.8%

0%

0%

0%

Massachusetts

25.4%

63%

0%

5.8%

5.8%

Michigan

34.7%

65.3%

0%

0%

0%

Minnesota

38.5%

51.2%

0%

5.1%

5.2%

Mississippi

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

Missouri

100%

Montana

60.1%

39.9%

Nebraska

61.7%

38.3%

0%

0%

0%

Nevada

61.4%

38.6%

0%

0%

0%

New Hampshire

35.1%

54%

0%

5.4%

5.5%

New Jersey

38.5%

61.5%

New Mexico

61.1%

38.9%

New York

26.9%

62.4%

0%

0%

6.8%

North Carolina

49.7%

50.3%

0%

0%

0%

North Dakota

52.9%

47.1%

0%

0%

0%

Ohio

37.3%

62.7%

Oklahoma

44.2%

39.7%

0%

8%

8.1%

Oregon

38.2%

61.6%

0%

0%

0%

Pennsylvania

35.8%

64.2%

0%

0%

0%

Rhode Island

35.6%

64.4%

South Carolina

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

South Dakota

60.4%

39.6%

Tennessee

62.7%

37.3%

0%

0%

0%

Texas

58.3%

41.7%

0%

0%

0%

Utah

63.4%

36.6%

0%

0%

0%

Vermont

66.5%

33.5%

0%

0%

0%

Virginia

51.1%

42.1%

0%

0%

6.9%

Washington

27%

60.7%

0%

6.1%

6.1%

West Virginia

50.5%

49.5%

Wisconsin

22.8%

26%

0%

0%

51.2%

Wyoming

48.8%

39.7%

0%

5.7%

5.7%

Republican Primary

Candidates for the Republican Nomination

  • Ronald Reagan, Governor of California 1967-1975, Candidate for President in 1968 and 1976 (Nominee)
  • George H.W Bush, Representative from Texas's 7th Congressional District 1967-1971, Ambassador to the United Nations 1971-1973, Republican National Committee Chairman 1973-1974, Ambassador to China 1974-1975, Director of the CIA 1976-1977
  • John Connally, Secretary of the Navy January 1961-December 1961, Governor of Texas 1963-1969, Secretary of the Treasury 1971-1972
  • Howard Baker, Senate Minority Leader since 1977, Senator from Tennessee since 1967
  • Bob Dole, Senator From Kansas since 1969, Republican National Committee Chairman 1971-1973, Vice Presidential Nominee in 1976
  • Phil Crane, Representative from Illinois's 12th District since 1973, Representative from Illinois's 13th District 1969-1973
  • John Anderson, Representative from Illinois's 16th District since 1961, Chairman of the House Republican Conference since 1969
  • Ben Fernandez, Businessman from Nevada, Special Ambassador to Paraguay from August 1st, 1973- August 31st, 1973


Campaign

Polling

Date

Ronald Regan

George H.W Bush

John Connally

Howard Baker

Bob Dole

Phil Crane

John Anderson

Ben Fernandez

October 2nd, 1979

21.5%

12%

12.3%

12.4%

6.3%

6.1%

8.3%

2.3%

October 9th, 1979

21.4%

12%

12.1%

12.5%

6.4%

6.2%

8.3%

2.3%

October 16th, 1979

21.4%

12.1%

12.3%

12.2%

6.3%

6.2%

8.4%

2.3%

October 23rd, 1979

21.2%

12.3%

12.4%

12.3%

6.2%

6.2%

8.4%

2.3%

October 30th, 1979

21.3%

12.5%

12.4%

12.3%

6.2%

6.1%

8.4%

2.4%

November 6th, 1979

21.2%

12.4%

12.4%

12.7%

6.5%

6.2%

8.4%

2.3%

November 13th, 1979

21.9%

12.5%

12.1%

12.4%

6.5%

6.1%

8.5%

2.3%

November 20th, 1979

21.7%

12.3%

12.4%

12.3%

6.5%

6.3%

8.5%

2.4%

November 27th, 1979

21.8%

12.4%

12.4%

12.3%

6.4%

6.3%

8.5%

2.4%

December 4th, 1979

21.3%

12.9%

12.4%

12.5%

6.4%

6.2%

8.4%

2.3%

December 11th, 1979

21.4%

12.8%

12.5%

12.4%

6.4%

6.3%

8.5%

2.3%

December 18th, 1979

21.2%

12.9%

12.2%

12.5%

6.4%

6.2%

8.5%

2.3%

December 25th, 1979

21.7%

12.7%

12.6%

12.2%

6.4%

6.2%

8.6%

2.3%

January 1st, 1980

21.5%

12.5%

12.3%

12.6%

6.5%

6.3%

8.4%

2.4%

January 8th, 1980

21.8%

12.7%

12.3%

12.5%

6.5%

6.2%

8.5%

2.3%

January 15th, 1980

22.2%

12.7%

12.8%

12.2%

6.5%

6.4%

8.4%

2.4%

January 22nd, 1980

22.5%

13.3%

12.7%

12%

6.6%

6.3%

8.5%

2.4%

January 29th, 1980

22%

13%

12.8%

12.5%

6.9%

6.2%

8.6%

2.4%

February 5th, 1980

22.7%

13.3%

12.9%

12.4%

6.6%

6.1%

8.6%

2.4%

February 12th, 1980

22.5%

13.4%

12.7%

12.4%

6.9%

6.3%

8.4%

2.4%

February 19th, 1980

21.9%

13.1%

12.7%

12.3%

6.6%

6.2%

9.6%

2.4%

February 26th, 1980

22.1%

13.3%

12.5%

12.3%

6.6%

6.2%

9.7%

2.4%

March 4th, 1980

22.2%

13.4%

12.8%

12.2%

6.5%

6.1%

9.6%

2.3%

March 11th, 1980

22.4%

13.4%

12.8%

12.1%

6.8%

6.1%

9.9%

2.4%

March 18th, 1980

22.2%

14%

13.1%

12.4%

6.8%

6.4%

10%

2.4%

March 25th, 1980

28.2%

16%

15.3%

14.4%

Withdrew from the race

6.9%

Withdrew from the race, running as an independent

4.7%

April 1st, 1980

35.6%

19.9%

18.3%

Withdrew from the Race

0%

8%

0%

5.6%

April 8th, 1980

40.1%

22.1%

19.7%

0%

0%

8.6%

0%

Withdrew from the race, endorsed Regan

April 15th, 1980

48.1%

24.3%

Withdrew from the race

0%

0%

11.6%

0%

0%

April 22nd, 1980

53.1%

26.8%

0%

0%

0%

12.7%

0%

0%

April 29th, 1980

61.1%

27.3%

0%

0%

0%

Withdrew from the race, endorsed Regan

0%

0%

May 6th, 1980

64.7%

29.4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

May 13th, 1980

65.7%

29.8%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

May 20th, 1980

66.8%

29.3%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

May 27th, 1980

77.3%

Withdrew from the race, effectively handing Regan the nomination

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Primary and Caucus Results

State

Ronald Regan

George H.W Bush

John Connally

Howard Baker

Bob Dole

Phil Crane

John Anderson

Ben Fernandez

Alabama        

25.9%

8.6%

17.3%

17.3%

8.6%

8.6%

10.2%

3.5%

Alaska

64.8%

17.7%

0%

0%

0%

17.5%

0%

0%

Arkansas

25.9%

8.6%

17.3%

17.3%

8.6%

8.6%

10.2%

3.5%

Arizona

26.1%

8.7%

17.4%

17.4%

8.7%

8.7%

9.5%

3.5%

California

100%

Colorado

100%

Connecticut

33.8%

32.2%

18.9%

0%

0%

8.4%

0%

6.7%

Delaware

100%

D.C

82.3%

17.7%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Florida

26%

8.7%

17.4%

17.4%

8.7%

8.7%

9.7%

3.5%

Georgia

25.7%

8.6%

17.2%

17.2%

8.6%

8.6%

10.8%

3.4%

Hawaii

82.2%

17.8%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Idaho

100%

Illinois

46.2%

6.9%

13%

13.1%

0%

16.3%

0%

4.5%

Indiana

82.1%

17.9%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Iowa

26.1%

36%

9%

13.5%

4.5%

4.5%

4.5%

1.8%

Kansas

56%

18.3%

20%

0%

0%

5.7%

0%

0%

Kentucky

100%

Louisiana

49%

15.9%

24.8%

0%

0%

10.3%

0%

0%

Maine

100%

Maryland

82.3%

17.7%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Massachusetts

13.1%

30.6%

8.7%

8.7%

4.4%

4.4%

28.3%

1.7%

Michigan

100%

Minnesota

43.9%

13.3%

24.2%

0%

0%

10.2%

0%

8.3%

Mississippi

100%

Missouri

43.9%

13.3%

24.2%

0%

0%

10.3%

0%

8.3%

Montana

100%

Nebraska

82.1%

17.9%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Nevada

100%

New Hampshire

48.6%

16.2%

8.1%

12.2%

4.1%

4.1%

5.1%

1.6%

New Jersey

100%

New Mexico

100%

New York

34.3%

32.4%

18.7%

0%

0%

8.1%

0%

6.5%

North Carolina

82.8%

17.8%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

North Dakota

64.9%

17.7%

0%

0%

0%

17.4%

0%

0%

Ohio

100%

Oklahoma

100%

Oregon

100%

Pennsylvania

40.9%

59.1%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Rhode Island

100%

South Carolina

100%

South Dakota

23.8%

7.9%

23.8%

15.9%

7.9%

7.9%

9.5%

3.2%

Tennessee

83%

17%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Texas

54.2%

45.8%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Utah

100%

Vermont

100%

Virginia

32.6%

10.5%

20.3%

20.1%

0%

9.2%

0%

7.2%

Washington

25.8%

8.6%

17.2%

17.2%

8.6%

8.6%

10.5%

3.4%

West Virginia

100%

Wisconsin

49%

15.9%

24.8%

0%

0%

10.3%

0%

0%

Wyoming

82.2%

17.8%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

General Election

Campaign

Polling

Date

(D) Ted Kennedy/Jerry Brown

(R) Ronald Regan/ Bob Dole

(I) John Anderson/Patrick Lucey

June 17th, 1980

46%

44.6%

1.9%

June 24th, 1980

46.6%

44.7%

1.8%

July 1st, 1980

46.8%

44.9%

1.9%

July 8th, 1980

46.6%

45.7%

1.8%

July 15th, 1980

47.2%

45.4%

1.8%

July 22nd, 1980

47.6%

45.3%

1.8%

July 29th, 1980

46.5%

46.8%

1.8%

August 5th, 1980

46.5%

46.8%

1.8%

August 12th, 1980

46.5%

47%

1.9%

August 15th, 1980

46.8%

46.7%

1.9%

August 20th, 1980

46.9%

46.5%

1.9%

August 27th, 1980

46.3%

46.7%

1.9%

September 3rd, 1980

46.4%

46.6%

1.9%

September 10th, 1980

46%

47.1%

2%

September 17th, 1980

46.3%

47.2%

2%

September 24th, 1980

46.4%

47.3%

2%

October 1st, 1980

46%

47.7%

2%

October 8th, 1980

46.5%

47.4%

2%

October 15th, 1980

46.7%

47.2%

2%

October 22nd, 1980

46.7%

47.4%

2%

October 29th, 1980

46.9%

47.1%

2%

Final

48.3%

49.1%

2.7%

Popular Vote

39,307,039

39,947,546

2,184,077






Results

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki