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1970 IIHF World Championship (WFAC)

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1970 IIHF World Championship
1970 IIHF World Championship logo (Munich Goes Sour)
Tournament details
Host country Canada
Teams 8
Venue(s) (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Gold medal blank Soviet Union Soviet Union (9th title)
Runner-up Silver medal blank Canada Canada
Third place Bronze medal blank Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
Fourth place Sweden Sweden
Tournament statistics
Matches played 40
Scoring leader(s) Soviet Union Alexander Maltsev (18 points)
(21 points)
MVP Canada Phil Esposito
1969
1974

The 1970 IIHF Ice Hockey World Championships was the 37th edition of the Ice Hockey World Championships hosted by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). Teams participated at three levels of competition. Pool A was played between 2–15 September 1970 in in Montreal and Winnipeg, Canada. Pool B was arranged in Bucharest, Romania between 24 February - 5 March 1970, while Pool C was arranged in in Klagenfurt, Austria between 13–22 February 1970.

The Pool A tournament was the first true best-on-best world championship in hockey history as it allowed any player to represent their team regardless of amateur or professional status. It was an eight-team, round robin tournament with playoff round comprising of two semifinals, a bronze medal game and a final. Canada was favoured to win as they had brought what was argued to be the strongest team in the nation's history, with the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia as the contenders. Despite the strength of the Canadian team, the Soviet Union won the world championship for the eighth straight year after defeating Canada in the final. Czechoslovakia defeated Sweden to claim the bronze medal. Phil Esposito was named the most valuable player of the tournament, and Alexander Maltsev was the leading scorer.

Consequently, the success of the event paved the way for greater use of professional players in the World Championship and later the Winter Olympics. This tournament was also the first one to make helmets mandatory for all skaters.

Background

The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (CAHA) had complained for years that Team Canada faced a competitive disadvantage in international tournaments as it was restricted from using its best players, who were professionals in the National Hockey League (NHL), while European teams masked the status of their best players. As a result, Canada was not able to field their best players in top international tournaments. While the top players in Europe qualified as amateurs, all the best Canadian players competed in the professional NHL or World Hockey Association.

The disastrous results at the 1969 World Hockey Championship made the CAHA reconsider the national team. It was clear that the gap between the Canadian amateurs and the best teams in Europe was growing: in Innsbruck in 1964, the Canadians had lost close games to the Soviets and Czechoslovaks and beaten the other teams; by 1969 they were being regularly pastet by the Soviets and the Czechoslovaks as well as the Swedes and playing life and death to defeat teams like Finland. Canada thus decided to ask the IIHF to add a limited number of professional players to the Canadian roster for the 1970 World Championships that were to be held in Winnipeg and Montreal. In July 1969, on a trial basis, the inclusion of nine professional players for any event for one year was agreed to by the IIHF.

Canada entered a team with five professionals in the Izvestia tournament at Christmas in 1969, and nearly won the tournament. The Soviets complained that playing against professional players would negatively impact their amateur players' Olympic eligiblity, while Hockey Canada (a new organization established in 1969 made up of the CAHA, the NHL, NHLPA (the NHL's players union) and the Canadian government) had the official position that the World Hockey Championships and the Olympics should be open to all players. They argued that the Soviet amateur players were only amateurs on paper, and threatened to withdraw from international competitions.

Fearing that the absence of Canada would be a massive blow to international hockey, the newly elected President of the IIHF, Miroslav Šubrt, worked to reconcile the opposing sides. He initiated talks with NHLPA president and Hockey Canada director Alan Eagleson, and the negotiations, which included the IIHF, Hockey Canada, the NHL and the NHLPA, lasted almost a year. Šubrt and Eagleson would become the central figures in the organization of the changed World Championships, and eventually managed to find a compromise. At the 54th IIHF Congress on 24–28 May 1970 the IIHF announced following agreements: the World Championships moved to an open format that allowed professionals to participate. The Olympic ice hockey tournament, however, would following Soviet wishes remain an amateur tournament (which lasted until 1994). Taking inspiration from soccer's FIFA World Cup, Šubrt proposed that the tournament should be played every four years, and arrange them in alternating even-numbered years with the Winter Olympics. To avoid a clash between the tournament and the Stanley Cup playoffs, the Pool A tournament would be moved to end-August and start-September. The Canadians also agreed to play the games under international rules as well as agreed to IIHF amateur referees. The refereeing would use the international two referee system. Eagleson, who could call on a personal network of players, NHL owners, Hockey Canada executives and Canadian business, then convinced the NHL and the NHLPA to support the tournament with promises of increased pension contributions resulting from their participation. To strengthen the smaller hockey nations, regional tournaments (European Championship) would be played every two years in alternating uneven-numbered years between the World Championships and the Winter Olympics.

As the Soviets were looking for a new challenge in ice hockey and ready to play against Canadian professionals, they agreed to the terms. As a result, the tournament would be the first true best-on-best world championship in hockey history as it allowed any player to represent their team regardless of amateur or professional status.

Qualified teams

The five teams of the 1969 was automatically qualified for the tournament, along with the United States, who had originally been relegated Pool B after losing all ten games. As Pool A was expanded from six to eight teams, the 1969 Pool B winner West Germany and runner-up Norway were also qualified for the 1970 Pool A tournament.

Date Vacancies Qualified
Host N/A 1 Canada Canada
Ranked 1−6 at the
1969 IIHF World Championship
15 – 30 March 1969 6 Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
Finland Finland
Germany West Germany
Soviet Union Soviet Union
Sweden Sweden
United States United States
Promoted from the
1969 IIHF World Championship Pool B
28 February – 9 March 1969 2 Norway Norway
Germany West Germany
Total 8

Preliminary round

Team GP W T L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
Canada Canada 7 7 0 0 46 12 +34 14 Advances to the quarter finals
Soviet Union Soviet Union 7 6 0 1 46 14 +32 12
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 7 4 1 2 39 18 +21 9
Sweden Sweden 7 4 0 3 30 21 +9 8
United States United States 7 3 1 3 23 26 –3 7
Finland Finland 7 2 0 5 23 47 –24 4
Norway Norway 7 1 0 6 20 53 –33 2
Germany West Germany 7 0 0 7 16 52 –36 0 Relegation to Pool B

21 August 1970
12:00
Soviet Union Soviet Union 2 – 1
Sweden Sweden Montreal Forum, Montreal

21 August 1970
16:00
Finland Finland 7 – 5
Germany West Germany Montreal Forum, Montreal

21 August 1970
19:00
Canada Canada 3 – 2
(0–0, 1–0, 2–2)
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Montreal Forum, Montreal


22 August 1970
12:00
Norway Norway 4 – 6
(0–3, 1–1, 2–2)
United States United States Montreal Forum, Montreal

22 August 1970
16:00
Sweden Sweden 6 – 2
(0–1, 2–1, 1–2)
Germany West Germany Montreal Forum, Montreal

22 August 1970
19:00
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 3 – 4
(1–1, 2–1, 0–2)
Soviet Union Soviet Union Montreal Forum, Montreal


23 August 1970
16:00
Norway Norway 3 – 5
(–, –, –)
Finland Finland Montreal Forum, Montreal

23 August 1970
19:00
Canada Canada 4 – 2
(–, –, –)
United States United States Montreal Forum, Montreal


24 August 1970
16:00
Soviet Union Soviet Union 10 – 3
(–, –, –)
Finland Finland Montreal Forum, Montreal

24 August 1970
19:00
Canada Canada 11 – 3
(–, –, –)
Norway Norway Montreal Forum, Montreal


25 August 1970
16:00
United States United States 0 – 5
(–, –, –)
Soviet Union Soviet Union Montreal Forum, Montreal

25 August 1970
19:00
Sweden Sweden 1 – 4
(–, –, –)
Canada Canada Montreal Forum, Montreal


26 August 1970
16:00
West Germany Germany 3 – 4
(–, –, –)
Norway Norway Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

26 August 1970
19:00
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 8 – 0
(–, –, –)
Finland Finland Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg


27 August 1970
12:00
Canada Canada 11 – 2
(–, –, –)
Finland Finland Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

27 August 1970
16:00
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 9 – 1
(–, –, –)
Germany West Germany Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

27 August 1970
19:00
Soviet Union Soviet Union 13 – 2
(–, –, –)
Norway Norway Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg


28 August 1970
16:00
Sweden Sweden 5 – 2
(–, –, –)
United States United States Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

28 August 1970
19:00
Soviet Union Soviet Union 11 – 2
(–, –, –)
Germany West Germany Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg


29 August 1970
16:00
Finland Finland 4 – 6
(2–3, 1–2, 1–1)
Sweden Sweden Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

29 August 1970
19:00
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 4 – 4
(2–1, 2–1, 0–2)
United States United States Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg


30 August 1970
16:00
West Germany Germany 1 – 10
(–, –, –)
Canada Canada Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

30 August 1970
19:00
Norway Norway 2 – 8
(–, –, –)
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg


31 August 1970
12:00
United States United States 4 – 2
(–, –, –)
Finland Finland Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

31 August 1970
16:00
Sweden Sweden 7 – 2
(–, –, –)
Norway Norway Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

31 August 1970
19:00
Canada Canada 3 – 1
(–, –, –)
Soviet Union Soviet Union Winnipeg Arena, Winnipeg

Playoff round

  Semifinal                    
  1  Canada Canada 3  
  3  Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 2   Final
      1  Canada Canada 1
  Semifinal   2  Soviet Union Soviet Union 3
  2  Soviet Union Soviet Union 4
  4  Sweden Sweden 1   Bronze Medal Game
    3  Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 5
    4  Sweden Sweden 3

Semifinals


2 September 1970
19:00
Soviet Union Soviet Union 4 – 1
(2–1, 0–0, 2–0)
Sweden Sweden Montreal Forum, Montreal
Attendance: 16,485

3 September 1970
19:00
Finland Canada 1 – 0
(0–0, 0–0, 1–0)
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Montreal Forum, Montreal
Attendance: 17,346

Bronze medal game


5 September 1970
19:00
Bronze medal blank Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 5 – 3
(2–0, 2–2, 1–1)
Sweden Sweden Montreal Forum, Montreal
Attendance: 14,215

Gold medal game


6 September 1970
19:30
Silver medal blank Canada Canada 4 – 6
(2–1, 1–3, 0–2)
Soviet Union Soviet Union Gold medal blank Montreal Forum, Montreal
Attendance: 18,040

Final ranking

The official IIHF final ranking of the tournament:

Gold medal blank Soviet Union Soviet Union
Silver medal blank Canada Canada
Bronze medal blank Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
4 Sweden Sweden
5 United States United States
6 Finland Finland
7 Norway Norway
8 Germany West Germany

1970 IIHF World Championship Winners
Flag of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
9th title

Statistics

Scoring leaders

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0
7 0 0 0 0

Goaltending leaders

Awards

Directorate awards

Best players selected by the IIHF directorate:

Best Goaltender Best Defenceman Best Forward
Soviet Union Vladislav Tretiak (Soviet Union) Canada Bobby Orr (Canada) Canada Phil Esposito (Canada)

All-Star team

The tournament All-Star team voted by the media:

Goaltender Defencemen Forwards Tournament MVP
Soviet Union Vladislav Tretiak (Soviet Union) Canada Bobby Orr (Canada)
Czechoslovakia Jan Suchý (Czechoslovakia)
Soviet Union Anatoli Firsov (Soviet Union)
Canada Phil Esposito (Canada)
Soviet Union Alexander Maltsev (Soviet Union)
Canada Phil Esposito (Canada)

Team MVPs

Team Player
Canada Canada Phil Esposito
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia Václav Nedomanský
Finland Finland Urpo Ylönen
Norway Norway Olav Dalsøren
Soviet Union Soviet Union Alexander Maltsev
Sweden Sweden Lennart Svedberg
United States United States Tom Williams
Germany West Germany Anton Kehle

World Championship Pool B (Romania)

1970 IIHF World Championship Pool B
Tournament details
Host country Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg Romania
Dates 24 February – 5 March 1970
Teams 7
Venue(s) (in 1 host city)
Promoted  Flag of Poland.svg Poland
Relegated  Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg Romania
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg Bulgaria
Tournament statistics
Matches played 21
Scoring leader(s) Japan Takao Hikigi
MVP Japan Takao Hikigi
1969
1974

With Group B expanding to eight teams in 1974, no nation was relegated.

Team GP W T L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
Flag of Poland.svg Poland 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Promoted to Pool A
Japan Japan 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of Switzerland.svg Switzerland 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of East Germany.svg East Germany 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg Yugoslavia 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of Romania (1965-1989).svg Romania 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of Bulgaria (1971-1990).svg Bulgaria 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

World Championship Group C (Austria)

1970 IIHF World Championship Pool C
Tournament details
Host country Austria Austria
Dates 24 February – 5 March 1970
Teams 7
Venue(s) (in 1 host city)
Promoted  Austria Austria
Flag of Italy.svg Italy
Tournament statistics
Matches played 21
1969
1974

The 1970 IIHF World Championship Pool C tournament was contested in Klagenfurt, Austria between 13–22 February 1970. Austria and Italy were promoted to Pool B for the 1974 World Championship. With Pool B expanding to eight teams in 1974, no nation was relegated while Austria was promoted to Pool B.

Team GP W T L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
Austria Austria 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Promoted to Pool B
Flag of Italy.svg Italy 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
France France 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of Hungary (1957-1989; unofficial).svg Hungary 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Denmark Denmark 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Belgium Belgium 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

See also

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